Do your research. Check Kelly Blue Book for the proper price for the vehicle, including its mileage and apparent condition. Always downgrade the condition by one ranking for government auctions. Also, do some smart used-car research, such as checking Consumer Reports for reliability and the frequencies of particular repairs, and checking our road test information if it's a recent model vehicle.
The bidder, whether acting as principal, agent, officer or director of a company or otherwise, in any capacity whatsoever, and the company he represents, both jointly and severally agrees to indemnify and save harmless Auctioneer and its officers, directors, employees, agents, attorneys and its consignors, from any and all actions, causes of action, suits, damages, costs, and losses of any nature, including injury and death, arising from the purchase or use of any items, or the attendance or participation of bidder, his/her agents or employees, at the auction and/or on the auction site whether before, during, or after the auction.

Lots at police auctions range from brand new or graded from A down in used condition, or goods may be slightly marked. A good example would be high quality white goods. All items listed in any police auction are available for viewing and inspection prior to the sale. Faulty or damaged goods should be clearly marked, and faults are outlined by the auctioneer during the auction.
Many police forces across the UK sell on loot which they've seized. And because this isn't widely known about – and because the police sell on items they'd otherwise have to store or dispose of – you could bag real bargains. For example, we spotted a kids' bike for 99p (collection only), a classical guitar for £14 (incl delivery) and an Armani watch for £15 (collection only).
In an English auction, a dummy bid is a bid made by a dummy bidder acting in collusion with the auctioneer or vendor, designed to deceive genuine bidders into paying more. In a first-price auction, a dummy bid is an unfavourable bid designed so as not to become the winning bid. (The bidder does not want to win this auction, but he or she wants to make sure to be invited to the next auction).

Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.
Walrasian auction or Walrasian tâtonnement is an auction in which the auctioneer takes bids from both buyers and sellers in a market of multiple goods.[46] The auctioneer progressively either raises or drops the current proposed price depending on the bids of both buyers and sellers, the auction concluding when supply and demand exactly balance.[47] As a high price tends to dampen demand while a low price tends to increase demand, in theory there is a particular price somewhere in the middle where supply and demand will match.[46]

DATE COUNTRY AUCTION DETAILS 7-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 7-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 8-Jan United States Sale of 3-year notes 8-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Jan Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 8-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 8-Jan Netherlands DSL Auction 9-Jan United States Sale of 10-year notes 9-Jan Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Jan Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 10-Jan United States Sale of 30-year bond 10-Jan Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 10-Jan Italy Bills auction 11-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 11-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 15-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 16-Jan Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 16-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 16-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 17-Jan Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 21-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 21-Jan Belgium OLO Auction 21-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 24-Jan Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 24-Jan Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 25-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Jan Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 28-Jan United States Sale of 2-year notes 28-Jan United States Sale of 5-year notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 7-year notes 29-Jan Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 29-Jan Italy Bills auction 30-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 30-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 30-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 31-Jan Japan 2-year discount bill auction 1-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 4-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 4-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 5-Feb United States Sale of 3-year notes 5-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 5-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 6-Feb United States Sale of 10-year notes 6-Feb Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 7-Feb United States Sale of 30-year bond 7-Feb Japan 6-month discount bill auction 7-Feb Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 7-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 8-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 12-Feb Italy Bills auction 12-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 13-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 13-Feb Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 13-Feb Sweden Auction of government bonds 13-Feb Norway Auction of Treasuries 15-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 15-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year Inflation-Indexed Bonds 18-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 18-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 19-Feb Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Feb Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Feb United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 21-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 22-Feb Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 22-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Feb United States Sale of 2-year notes 25-Feb United States Sale of 5-year notes 26-Feb United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Feb Italy Bills auction 27-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Feb Japan 2-year discount bill auction
In order to appeal the decision to seize your goods, you will want to write out a Notice of Claim and hand in the appeal personally. Only the individual who owned the goods at the time of seizure is allowed to appeal the decision to seize them. It is well within your right to appeal the decision to take the goods or merchandise you owned while, at the same time, requesting that Customs return the items to you.
The first known auction house in the world was Stockholm Auction House, Sweden (Stockholms Auktionsverk), founded by Baron Claes Rålamb in 1674.[12][13] Sotheby's, currently the world's second-largest auction house,[12] was founded in London on 11 March 1744, when Samuel Baker presided over the disposal of "several hundred scarce and valuable" books from the library of an acquaintance. Christie's, now the world's largest auction house,[12] was founded by James Christie in 1766 in London[14] and published its first auction catalog in that year, although newspaper advertisements of Christie's sales dating from 1759 have been found.[15]
The New York City Police Department regularly holds online auctions to dispose of seized, unclaimed property and vehicles. The Property Clerk Division works with an outside auctioneer, called Property Room, which specializes in items seized by law enforcement agencies across the country. Online auctions include many high-end items, such as jewelry, rare coins, brand-name clothing, and consumer electronics. Vehicles are also available. Participation in online auctions is free and open to the general public.
Private treaty sales – Occasionally, when looking at an auction catalogue some of the items have been withdrawn. Usually these goods have been sold by 'private treaty'. This means that the goods have already been sold off, usually to a trader or dealer on a private, behind-the-scenes basis before they have had a chance to be offered at the auction sale. These goods are rarely in single lots – photocopiers or fax machines would generally be sold in bulk lots.
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd 11:07 am.  Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Thursday, March 21st 2pm to 7pm    [ View Full Listing ]
At the close of an auction, Treasury awards all noncompetitive bids that comply with the auction rules and then accepts competitive bids in ascending order of their rate, yield, or discount margin (lowest to highest) until the quantity of awarded bids reaches the offering amount. All bidders will receive the same rate, yield, or discount margin at the highest accepted bid.
The Treasury in Rome plans to auction as much as 5 billion euros ($5.7 billion) of debt Friday, including benchmark five-year and 10-year securities. Those sales represent the final government debt supply in the euro area for 2018. The results will provide an indication of the underlying demand for Italian bonds next year, according to Danske Bank A/S.
The District of Columbia now auctions its surplus property online through GovDeals, a Liquidity Services, Inc. marketplace. The district awarded the contract for the management of the inventory, appraisal, sale and shipping of the city's surplus property to Liquidity Services Inc. LSI conducts auctions of city assets such as vehicles, police automobile accessories, computer equipment, radios and other communications equipment, office furniture and other supplies through its online marketplace. The auctions are expected to improve data tracking and financial oversight of the city's surplus asset disposition activities.
All diesel vehicles and equipment operated in California may be subject to the California Air Resources Board (ARB) regulation to reduce emissions of air pollutants. Therefore, these items could be subject to exhaust retrofit or accelerated turnover requirements to reduce emissions of air pollutants. For more information, buyers may visit the ARB website at http://.arb.ca.gov/dieseltruck. Compliance with these regulations and all cost associated with meeting ARB requirements shall be the sole responsibility of the buyer.
Removal of all items shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser. Loading assistance is provided as a courtesy; however, purchaser assumes all risk and responsibility for loading and removal of purchases. Auctioneer reserves the right to require proof of adequate insurance coverage from any purchaser items requiring dismantling, rigging or hot cutting. Purchaser agrees to indemnify and save harmless both, consignor and Auctioneer, its officers, directors, employees, agents, and attorneys against any damage caused by the acts of purchaser. All items must be removed from the auction facility within 2 days after the auction date. If for any reason purchaser fails to remove any purchase within the time specified, the purchase shall be deemed abandoned, and Auctioneer at its sole discretion may resell the items. Purchaser shall be liable for any rent incurred or damages suffered by Auctioneer because of purchaser’s failure to remove any item. Failure to remove items will result in a rental / storage fee of not less than $25 per item per day.

Once a car has served its time, it’s stripped of all its Police markings, siren, radio, gun box and serviced, before going under the hammer. These vehicles may have done more miles than your average family runabout but, Police Cars are kept in tip-top condition. No expense is spared in keeping these motors immaculate and they receive the best parts, tyres, even oil.
Bidding. Get some information about the type of bidding that normally occurs at these auctions. Feel free to ask the consultant about the expected price of a particular vehicle. When the auction starts, raise your hand and registration number card high in the air so the auctioneer can see you. Bids can be in increments of $100, $250 or even $500. This will be up to the auctioneer's discretion. Before bidding, remember that once a bid is made it cannot be withdrawn. Once the bid is won then the bid cards must be immediately filled out and signed. If this is not done then the vehicle can be re-offered. The government can reject any bid
Consignee and consignor - as pertaining to auctions, the consignor (also called the seller, and in some contexts the vendor) is the person owning the item to be auctioned or the owner's representative,[65] while the consignee is the auction house. The consignor maintains title until such time that an item is purchased by a bidder and the bidder pays the auction house.

Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information

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