Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]

Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information
26-Mar Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 26-Mar Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 26-Mar Germany Auction of 2-year Treasury notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 5-year notes 27-Mar Italy Bills auction 27-Mar Sweden Auction of government bonds 27-Mar Norway Auction of Treasuries 27-Mar Germany Auction of 10-year Federal bonds 28-Mar United States Sale of 7-year notes 28-Mar Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Mar Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 1-Apr Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 2-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 3-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 3-Apr Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 3-Apr Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 4-Apr Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 5-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Apr Norway Auction of Treasury bills 8-Apr France Auction of BTF Treasury notes 9-Apr United States Sale of 3-year notes 9-Apr Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Apr Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 9-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 10-Apr United States Sale of 10-year notes 10-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 10-Apr Norway Auction of Treasuries 11-Apr United States Sale of 30-year bond 11-Apr Italy Bills auction 12-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 12-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 16-Apr Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 18-Apr Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Apr France Index-linked Securities auction 19-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 23-Apr United States Sale of 2-year notes 23-Apr Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 24-Apr United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 24-Apr United States Sale of 5-year notes 24-Apr Italy Zero Coupon/BTPi auction 24-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 25-Apr United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Apr Italy Bills auction 27-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 29-Apr Belgium OLO Auction
One way the federal government finances its activities is by the sale of marketable Treasury bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to the public. Marketable securities can be bought, sold or transferred after they are originally issued. Treasury uses an auction process to sell marketable securities and determine their rate, yield, or discount margin. The value of Treasury marketable securities fluctuates with changes in interest rates and market demand. You can participate in an auction and purchase bills, notes, bonds, FRNs, and TIPS directly from the Treasury or you can purchase them through a bank or broker. Marketable securities held in your account can be sold at current market prices through brokers and many financial institutions.
If you have had items taken by customs, there are a few different steps that you can take. If you believe that your goods were seized wrongfully or that customs had no legal right to take the items in question, you have 5 days to challenge the decision after receiving your Notice of Seizure. Your reasoning can be that the items were not in fact prohibited or restricted for importation, the goods were to be given away and not sold, and other reasons that could make the decision to have the goods seized incorrect.
LIVE AUCTION! VINTAGE MOTORCYCLES, CARS! OVER 20 CLASSIC VEHICLES SELL REGARDLESS OF PRICE! HARLEY DAVIDSON, BSA, MOTO GUZZI, CUSHMAN, CUSTOM CHOPPERS, FORD THUNDERBIRD, CHEVY CORVETTE, CROSLEY, CHEVY TRUCK, FORD BRONCO ONLINE BIDDING IS NOW OPEN! OR BID LIVE IN-PERSON AT OUR PHOENIX WAREHOUSE! SATURDAY MARCH 23RD AUCTION PREVIEW 9:00 AM AUCTION START 10:00 AM ONLINE   [ View Full Listing ]
In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.
This is the practice, especially by high-end art auctioneers,[64] of raising false bids at crucial times in the bidding in order to create the appearance of greater demand or to extend bidding momentum for a work on offer. To call out these nonexistent bids auctioneers might fix their gaze at a point in the auction room that is difficult for the audience to pin down.[65] The practice is frowned upon in the industry.[65] In the United States, chandelier bidding is not illegal. In fact, an auctioneer may bid up the price of an item to the reserve price, which is an unstated amount the consignor will not sell the item for. However, the auction house is required to disclose this information.
Don't get discouraged with your first auction. It takes a good sense of what a vehicle is worth, and the ability to think fast-plus some luck and common sense-to get a good deal. Watch the seasoned bidders at work to catch the gist of it. If you're a smart bidder, government auctions can be a good place to find an inexpensive second car or work truck. Just remember: any deal that seems to be too good to be true probably is!
Reserve auction is an auction where the item for sale may not be sold if the final bid is not high enough to satisfy the seller; that is, the seller reserves the right to accept or reject the highest bid.[37] In these cases a set 'reserve' price known to the auctioneer, but not necessarily to the bidders, may have been set, below which the item may not be sold.[36] If the seller announces to the bidders the reserve price, it is a public reserve price auction.[39] In contrast, if the seller does not announce the reserve price before the sale but only after the sale, it is a secret reserve price auction.[40] The reserve price may be fixed or discretionary. In the latter case, the decision to accept a bid is deferred to the auctioneer, who may accept a bid that is marginally below it. A reserve auction is safer for the seller than a no-reserve auction as they are not required to accept a low bid, but this could result in a lower final price if less interest is generated in the sale.[37]
Property becomes tax-defaulted land if property taxes remain unpaid at 12:01 a.m. on July 1st.  Property that is tax-defaulted after five years (or three years in the case of property also subject to a nuisance abatement lien) becomes subject to the county tax collector’s power to sell that property in order to satisfy the defaulted property taxes. The county tax collector must attempt to sell the property within four years of becoming subject to sale.
A ring can also be used to increase the price of an auction lot, in which the owner of the object being auctioned may increase competition by taking part in the bidding him or herself, but drop out of the bidding just before the final bid. In Britain and many other countries, rings and other forms of bidding on one's own object are illegal. This form of a ring was used as a central plot device in an episode of the British television series Lovejoy (series 4, episode 3), in which the price of a watercolour by the (fictional) Jessie Webb is inflated so that others by the same artist could be sold for more than their purchase price.
The District of Columbia now auctions its surplus property online through GovDeals, a Liquidity Services, Inc. marketplace. The district awarded the contract for the management of the inventory, appraisal, sale and shipping of the city's surplus property to Liquidity Services Inc. LSI conducts auctions of city assets such as vehicles, police automobile accessories, computer equipment, radios and other communications equipment, office furniture and other supplies through its online marketplace. The auctions are expected to improve data tracking and financial oversight of the city's surplus asset disposition activities.
The New York City Police Department regularly holds online auctions to dispose of seized, unclaimed property and vehicles. The Property Clerk Division works with an outside auctioneer, called Property Room, which specializes in items seized by law enforcement agencies across the country. Online auctions include many high-end items, such as jewelry, rare coins, brand-name clothing, and consumer electronics. Vehicles are also available. Participation in online auctions is free and open to the general public.
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd 12:07 pm Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Friday, March 15th 9am to 2pm  INSPECT:   [ View Full Listing ]

Most people didn't worry about the Fed monetizing debt until the 2008 recession. That's because until then, open market operations weren't large purchases. Between November 2010 and June 2011, the Fed bought $600 billion of longer-term Treasurys. That was the first phase of the expansion of the operations of the central bank, or quantitative easing, known as QE1.
The goods found at Police Auction can be brand new or graded from A down in used condition. Goods may be slightly marked a good example would be high quality push-bikes which still retain a good value. All items listed in any Police Auction are available for viewing and inspection prior to the sale. If faulty or damaged the fact is clearly mentioned on the item and faults will be outlined by the auctioneer during the auction. If this is an Online Police Auction the description should be clear and accurate. These auction events are a prime location for bargain hunters. Many of the goods will be sold for extremely low prices and almost always under market value. Remember, these goods are at auction TO BE SOLD, the police forces need to clear their stores regardless of how low the highest bid for the items at the Police Auction.
CWS Asset Management and Sales (CWSAMS) is a nationwide company with expertise in the management, marketing and sales of a wide range of assets, specializing in web-based and live auctions. CWSAMS has provided continuous support to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, its legacy agencies, and other public & private entities for the marketing and sale of real and personal property for the past 26 years. An abbreviated list of clients are:
Some items are being offered for sale to out of state or out of country bidders. Bidders are hereby notified that a VIN Stop has been filed with California DMV prohibiting the vehicle/equipment from being registered in California. Purchaser will be required to sign an ARB Out-of-State Verification Form acknowledging their intent to move the vehicle/equipment out of California, and an Out-of-State Sales Agreement indicating that the Buyer will inform future buyers that the vehicle cannot be registered and operated in California unless compliant with Section 2022.1(b). Bidders purchasing Out-of-State items must be registered as an out of State buyer with Bar None Auction prior to bidding.
Any dispute arising as to any bidding shall be settled by Auctioneer at his sole discretion, and Auctioneer may put the lot in dispute up for sale again. Auctioneer reserves the right to refuse any bid, which it considers to be an insignificant advance over the preceding bid. No person shall bid on any lot of which he is the Consignor, agent, associate, or on behalf of the Consignor.
Treasury bills are routinely issued at weekly tenders, held by the DMO on the last business day of each week (i.e. usually on Fridays), for settlement on the following business day. Treasury bills are typically issued at tenders with maturities of 1 month (approximately 28 days), 3 months (approximately 91 days), or 6 months (approximately 182 days).
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The word "auction" is derived from the Latin augeō, which means "I increase" or "I augment".[1] For most of history, auctions have been a relatively uncommon way to negotiate the exchange of goods and commodities. In practice, both haggling and sale by set-price have been significantly more common.[5] Indeed, before the seventeenth century the few auctions that were held were sporadic.[6]
A primary dealer is a firm that buys government securities directly from a government, with the intention of reselling them to others, thus acting as a market maker of government securities. The government may regulate the behavior and number of its primary dealers and impose conditions of entry. Some governments sell their securities only to primary dealers; some sell them to others as well. Governments that use primary dealers include Belgium, Brazil,[1] Canada, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Singapore, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
Silent auction is a variant of the English auction in which bids are written on a sheet of paper. At the predetermined end of the auction, the highest listed bidder wins the item.[43] This auction is often used in charity events, with many items auctioned simultaneously and "closed" at a common finish time.[43][44] The auction is "silent" in that there is no auctioneer selling individual items,[43] the bidders writing their bids on a bidding sheet often left on a table near the item.[45] At charity auctions, bid sheets usually have a fixed starting amount, predetermined bid increments, and a "guaranteed bid" amount which works the same as a "buy now" amount. Other variations of this type of auction may include sealed bids.[43] The highest bidder pays the price he or she submitted.[43]
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
Treasury bills are routinely issued at weekly tenders, held by the DMO on the last business day of each week (i.e. usually on Fridays), for settlement on the following business day. Treasury bills are typically issued at tenders with maturities of 1 month (approximately 28 days), 3 months (approximately 91 days), or 6 months (approximately 182 days).
The relationship between the Fed and the primary dealers is governed by the Primary Dealers Act of 1988 and the Fed's operating policy "Administration of Relationships with Primary Dealers."[6] Primary dealers purchase the vast majority of the U.S. Treasury securities (T-bills, T-notes, and T-bonds) sold at auction, and resell them to the public. Their activities extend well beyond the Treasury market. For example, according to the Wall Street Journal Europe (2/9/06 p. 20), all of the top ten dealers in the foreign exchange market are also primary dealers, and between them account for almost 73% of foreign exchange trading volume. Arguably, this group's members are the most influential and powerful non-governmental institutions in global financial markets. Group membership changes slowly, with the current list available from the New York Fed.[2]
To finance the public debt, the U.S. Treasury sells bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to institutional and individual investors through public auctions. Treasury auctions occur regularly and have a set schedule. There are three steps to an auction: announcement of the auction, bidding, and issuance of the purchased securities.
In some parts of England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries auction by candle began to be used for the sale of goods and leaseholds.[10] In a candle auction, the end of the auction was signaled by the expiration of a candle flame, which was intended to ensure that no one could know exactly when the auction would end and make a last-second bid. Sometimes, other unpredictable processes, such as a footrace, were used in place of the expiration of a candle. This type of auction was first mentioned in 1641 in the records of the House of Lords.[11] The practice rapidly became popular, and in 1660 Samuel Pepys's diary recorded two occasions when the Admiralty sold surplus ships "by an inch of candle". Pepys also relates a hint from a highly successful bidder, who had observed that, just before expiring, a candle-wick always flares up slightly: on seeing this, he would shout his final - and winning - bid. The London Gazette began reporting on the auctioning of artwork at the coffeehouses and taverns of London in the late 17th century.

Participants in any Treasury auction consist of small investors and institutional investors who submit bids categorized as either competitive or non-competitive tenders. Non-competitive tenders are submitted by smaller investors who are guaranteed to receive bills, but they won’t know what discount rate they will receive until the auction closes. In effect, these investors receive no guarantee on the price or discount received. An investor who submits a non-competitive bid agrees to accept whatever discount rate is decided at the auction, determined by the competitive side of the auction which is handled as a Dutch auction. The minimum non-competitive tender for a Treasury bill is $10,000. The non-competitive closing time for bills is normally 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on auction day.
This site advertises auctions of seized Real Property for sale throughout the United States and Puerto Rico and includes single and multi-family residences; commercial and residential land; commercial buildings and warehouses; and operating businesses. These properties have been seized and forfeited due to violations of federal laws enforced by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Participating enforcement agencies include: IRS-Criminal Investigations Division, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the U.S. Secret Service. All proceeds from the sale of property are deposited in the U.S. Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund. This fund helps support continued law enforcement efforts and provide restitution to crime victims.
Senior auction is a variation on the all-pay auction, and has a defined loser in addition to the winner. The top two bidders must pay their full final bid amounts, and only the highest wins the auction. The intent is to make the high bidders bid above their upper limits. In the final rounds of bidding, when the current losing party has hit their maximum bid, they are encouraged to bid over their maximum (seen as a small loss) to avoid losing their maximum bid with no return (a very large loss).
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