In some parts of England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries auction by candle began to be used for the sale of goods and leaseholds.[10] In a candle auction, the end of the auction was signaled by the expiration of a candle flame, which was intended to ensure that no one could know exactly when the auction would end and make a last-second bid. Sometimes, other unpredictable processes, such as a footrace, were used in place of the expiration of a candle. This type of auction was first mentioned in 1641 in the records of the House of Lords.[11] The practice rapidly became popular, and in 1660 Samuel Pepys's diary recorded two occasions when the Admiralty sold surplus ships "by an inch of candle". Pepys also relates a hint from a highly successful bidder, who had observed that, just before expiring, a candle-wick always flares up slightly: on seeing this, he would shout his final - and winning - bid. The London Gazette began reporting on the auctioning of artwork at the coffeehouses and taverns of London in the late 17th century.
Removal of all items shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser. Loading assistance is provided as a courtesy; however, purchaser assumes all risk and responsibility for loading and removal of purchases. Auctioneer reserves the right to require proof of adequate insurance coverage from any purchaser items requiring dismantling, rigging or hot cutting. Purchaser agrees to indemnify and save harmless both, consignor and Auctioneer, its officers, directors, employees, agents, and attorneys against any damage caused by the acts of purchaser. All items must be removed from the auction facility within 2 days after the auction date. If for any reason purchaser fails to remove any purchase within the time specified, the purchase shall be deemed abandoned, and Auctioneer at its sole discretion may resell the items. Purchaser shall be liable for any rent incurred or damages suffered by Auctioneer because of purchaser’s failure to remove any item. Failure to remove items will result in a rental / storage fee of not less than $25 per item per day.
There are a number of primary website used by police to sell seized or lost and found items. bumblebeeauctions.co.uk acts effectively as a shop front the police force and local authorities which can use to dispose of various types of property. It is an official police website used by various forces across the country. Users bid on items in the same way as they would on sites such as eBay.co.uk.
If for any reason, Auctioneer is unable to make available or deliver any purchase or clear title to the same, or documentation required in respect of any purchase, whether before or after delivery, Auctioneer’s sole liability shall be the return of monies paid in respect of such purchase upon its return by purchaser. Any such purchase shall be returned or surrendered upon demand by Auctioneer.
Senior auction is a variation on the all-pay auction, and has a defined loser in addition to the winner. The top two bidders must pay their full final bid amounts, and only the highest wins the auction. The intent is to make the high bidders bid above their upper limits. In the final rounds of bidding, when the current losing party has hit their maximum bid, they are encouraged to bid over their maximum (seen as a small loss) to avoid losing their maximum bid with no return (a very large loss).
Senior auction is a variation on the all-pay auction, and has a defined loser in addition to the winner. The top two bidders must pay their full final bid amounts, and only the highest wins the auction. The intent is to make the high bidders bid above their upper limits. In the final rounds of bidding, when the current losing party has hit their maximum bid, they are encouraged to bid over their maximum (seen as a small loss) to avoid losing their maximum bid with no return (a very large loss).
Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.
Police Auction events are handled differently depending on the various police forces. Some authorities commission auctions through various contracted auctioneers. Others hold Online Police Auctions through various websites. The issue is that the police auctioneers who are appointed to sell goods is constantly changing. So to keep up-to-date with upcoming police auctions around the country use the GAUK Auction Search Engine and for those elusive Police Auction lots try Lot Shark alert service.
At the close of an auction, Treasury awards all noncompetitive bids that comply with the auction rules and then accepts competitive bids in ascending order of their rate, yield, or discount margin (lowest to highest) until the quantity of awarded bids reaches the offering amount. All bidders will receive the same rate, yield, or discount margin at the highest accepted bid.

Due to the various governmental units that supply the vehicles for auction, there's no single reason for vehicles being brought to auction. Some of the vehicles are confiscated due to the former owner's involvement in drug dealing, smuggling, or fraud, while other vehicles were simply just abandoned. On exception, separate auctions will sometimes be held for very large seizures.
Bid NOW http://baileyshonor.com/auctions/2019/OL190321/details.htm Over 70 pieces of Roseville Pottery, 25 lots of vintage colored plastic table top radios and transistors, Over 35 lots of antique and vintage clocks (mantle and alarm), nice painted primitive cupboards and cabinets including corner cabinets and pie safe, Shaker and Deacon benches, Hoosier style kitchen cupboards, 60" HD 3D   [ View Full Listing ]
Capital Auto Auction hosts weekly live auctions at each of our four locations, as well as online. Whether you attend a live auto auction or an online auto auction, you'll find quality used vehicles listed at the kind of bargain prices that typically only dealers see. Our vehicles may be repossessions, dealer consignments, government vehicles or donations. In every case, they are auctioned openly to the public so it's easy for customers to find or sell the vehicles they need. What's more, it's not just individual cars that we work with, either; through a fleet auto auction, you have a way to quickly dispose of fleet vehicles you no longer need.
26-Mar Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 26-Mar Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 26-Mar Germany Auction of 2-year Treasury notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 5-year notes 27-Mar Italy Bills auction 27-Mar Sweden Auction of government bonds 27-Mar Norway Auction of Treasuries 27-Mar Germany Auction of 10-year Federal bonds 28-Mar United States Sale of 7-year notes 28-Mar Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Mar Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 1-Apr Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 2-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 3-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 3-Apr Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 3-Apr Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 4-Apr Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 5-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Apr Norway Auction of Treasury bills 8-Apr France Auction of BTF Treasury notes 9-Apr United States Sale of 3-year notes 9-Apr Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Apr Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 9-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 10-Apr United States Sale of 10-year notes 10-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 10-Apr Norway Auction of Treasuries 11-Apr United States Sale of 30-year bond 11-Apr Italy Bills auction 12-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 12-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 16-Apr Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 18-Apr Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Apr France Index-linked Securities auction 19-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 23-Apr United States Sale of 2-year notes 23-Apr Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 24-Apr United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 24-Apr United States Sale of 5-year notes 24-Apr Italy Zero Coupon/BTPi auction 24-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 25-Apr United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Apr Italy Bills auction 27-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 29-Apr Belgium OLO Auction
English auction, also known as an open ascending price auction. This type of auction is arguably the most common form of auction in use today.[1] Participants bid openly against one another, with each subsequent bid required to be higher than the previous bid.[2] An auctioneer may announce prices, bidders may call out their bids themselves (or have a proxy call out a bid on their behalf), or bids may be submitted electronically with the highest current bid publicly displayed.[2] In some cases a maximum bid might be left with the auctioneer, who may bid on behalf of the bidder according to the bidder's instructions.[2] The auction ends when no participant is willing to bid further, at which point the highest bidder pays their bid.[2] Alternatively, if the seller has set a minimum sale price in advance (the 'reserve' price) and the final bid does not reach that price the item remains unsold.[2] Sometimes the auctioneer sets a minimum amount by which the next bid must exceed the current highest bid.[2] The most significant distinguishing factor of this auction type is that the current highest bid is always available to potential bidders.[2] The English auction is commonly used for selling goods, most prominently antiques and artwork,[2] but also secondhand goods and real estate.
The District of Columbia now auctions its surplus property online through GovDeals, a Liquidity Services, Inc. marketplace. The district awarded the contract for the management of the inventory, appraisal, sale and shipping of the city's surplus property to Liquidity Services Inc. LSI conducts auctions of city assets such as vehicles, police automobile accessories, computer equipment, radios and other communications equipment, office furniture and other supplies through its online marketplace. The auctions are expected to improve data tracking and financial oversight of the city's surplus asset disposition activities.
Whenever bidders at an auction are aware of the identity of the other bidders there is a risk that they will form a "ring" or "pool" and thus manipulate the auction result, a practice known as collusion. By agreeing to bid only against outsiders, never against members of the "ring", competition becomes weaker, which may dramatically affect the final price level. After the end of the official auction an unofficial auction may take place among the "ring" members. The difference in price between the two auctions could then be split among the members. This form of a ring was used as a central plot device in the opening episode of the 1979 British television series The House of Caradus, 'For Love or Money', uncovered by Helena Caradus on her return from Paris.

State Fleet Management will hold another Vehicle Auction on March 7, 2019 at the North Campus location, 1001 E. 62nd Avenue, Denver. The sealed-bid auctions are open to the public for accident, drivable, and non-drivable vehicles that need to be moved out of the fleet. Click here for sample sealed-bid sheet. On-site auctions are held approximately every 3-6 months depending on the amount of inventory, as well as selling other vehicles weekly on a year-round auction site, www.colo-auto-sales.com.
At Capital Auto Auction, we buy, sell and accept donations of used vehicles of various kinds. Whether it's for cars, boats or fleets of vehicles, we make it our goal to work out arrangements that satisfy both buyers and sellers. Our live auctions take place in four locations: Manchester, New Hampshire; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Temple Hills, Maryland; and Washington, DC. Our online auctions make it possible for you to bid on cars from your computer or smartphone. Also, in addition to hosting weekly auctions, we accept vehicles on consignments, doing all the advertising and networking to help you get a car sold.
Bidder acknowledges that an auction site is a potentially dangerous place. Flammable, noxious, corrosive and pressurized substances are present, heavy equipment is being operated and electric circuits may be live. Every person at the auction site, at any time, shall be there at his own risk without notice of the condition of the premises and the activities thereon and bidder shall so advise his agents and employees. No person shall have any claim against Auctioneer, its officers, directors, agents, employees, principals, or attorneys for any injuries sustained, nor for damages to or loss of property, which may occur from any cause whatsoever.

Seized Assets Auctioneers is excited to invite you to bid on our wonderful collection of luxury items. Our auction house is committed to giving you the chance to win lots of amazing items at a fraction of retail cost. Jewelry, currency, art, fashion, cars, and rare memorabilia, WE HAVE IT ALL! Our auctions start every day at 9AM PST! Bid early and bid often!! We'll see you on the auction block!

The State of Georgia primarily offers surplus state property to the public through internet auction providers. Click on the square below to see property that is currently being offered on each site. To place bids on these auction sites, you must first set up a user account. To set up a user account, click on the desired auction site under Areas of Focus and follow the sites' instructions.
Removal of all items shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser. Loading assistance is provided as a courtesy; however, purchaser assumes all risk and responsibility for loading and removal of purchases. Auctioneer reserves the right to require proof of adequate insurance coverage from any purchaser items requiring dismantling, rigging or hot cutting. Purchaser agrees to indemnify and save harmless both, consignor and Auctioneer, its officers, directors, employees, agents, and attorneys against any damage caused by the acts of purchaser. All items must be removed from the auction facility within 2 days after the auction date. If for any reason purchaser fails to remove any purchase within the time specified, the purchase shall be deemed abandoned, and Auctioneer at its sole discretion may resell the items. Purchaser shall be liable for any rent incurred or damages suffered by Auctioneer because of purchaser’s failure to remove any item. Failure to remove items will result in a rental / storage fee of not less than $25 per item per day. 

PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd 12:07 pm Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Friday, March 15th 9am to 2pm  INSPECT:   [ View Full Listing ]
At the close of an auction, Treasury awards all noncompetitive bids that comply with the auction rules and then accepts competitive bids in ascending order of their rate, yield, or discount margin (lowest to highest) until the quantity of awarded bids reaches the offering amount. All bidders will receive the same rate, yield, or discount margin at the highest accepted bid.
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
Depending on the agency, the government may use revenue from auctioned items to support crime-prevention programs, pay restitution to crime victims or purchase new equipment the department needs. "By providing agencies with the ability to dispose of excess assets, GSA benefits taxpayers by eliminating the need to maintain and store the unneeded property while also raising more than $300 million in revenue in just the last two years," a GSA spokesperson said. 

The primary dealers form a worldwide network that distributes new U.S. government debt. For example, Daiwa Securities and Mizuho Securities distribute the debt to Japanese buyers. BNP Paribas, Barclays, Deutsche Bank, and RBS Greenwich Capital (a division of the Royal Bank of Scotland) distribute the debt to European buyers. Goldman Sachs, and Citigroup account for many American buyers. Nevertheless, most of these firms compete internationally and in all major financial centers.

Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
Going, going, gone! Live auctions are always exciting and entertaining whether you're the bidder or not, and government auctions are no exception. Make sure you don't miss your cue to bid. If you're not clear on how bidding progresses, ask one of the auction company officials. Some items will have an undisclosed set minimum bid (reserve), while most items will be offered without reserve. Most auctions will also accept in-absence, written bids if the bidder follows special procedures and the bid is received more than a day before the auction.
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