You can find some information online, on government websites which will let you search your area for a particular vehicle. These sites are not limited to cars, either. You can find SUVs, trucks and motorcycles on many of them too. Doing a ZIP code search and choosing a specific model will show you all the vehicles within a certain distance from you. Police specific auctions can be found by other websites like gov-auctions, which tells you when and where the local auctions will take place.
MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN: 303190). The registered office address of both MoneySupermarket.com Group PLC and MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited (registered in England No. 3157344) is MoneySupermarket House, St. David's Park, Ewloe, Chester, CH5 3UZ. MoneySavingExpert.com Limited is an appointed representative of MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited.
GAUK Police Auctions & Sales category lists everything you need in an easy to read page outlining all the details of Police Auctions within the UK. In an attempt to stop the lost and found departments becoming crammed and to reduce the number of items stored in the Police Property Store UK police forces sell consignments of stolen and recovered and seized goods through a Police Auction. These sales include vehicles, bicycles, clothing, electronics, furniture and many other items, which end up in the police property room.
An announcement is released several days before the bill auction to kickstart the process. The announcement includes information such as the auction date, issue date, amount of security that will be sold, bidding close times, participation eligibility, etc. All auctions are open to the public through Treasury Direct or the Treasury Automated Auction Processing System (TAAPS).

U.S. Marshal's Service Auctions : And finally, the U.S. Marshal's service auctions off some true bling as part of its mission to "combat major criminal activity by disrupting and dismantling illegal enterprises" and "depriving criminals of the proceeds of illegal activity." Once again, there is real estate, but also businesses, cash cars, collectibles — and more.


Auction includes over 1,000 items from State and Federal agencies, abandoned safe deposit boxes, unredeemed pledged assets from various Financial Institutions, several business inventory liquidations, several estates and other consignors. Auction will feature collectible coins & currency, rare art, fine jewelry, luxury watches, sports memorabilia, rugs, electronics, all types of collectibles & much more! 
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
CWS Asset Management and Sales (CWSAMS) is a nationwide company with expertise in the management, marketing and sales of a wide range of assets, specializing in web-based and live auctions. CWSAMS has provided continuous support to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, its legacy agencies, and other public & private entities for the marketing and sale of real and personal property for the past 26 years. An abbreviated list of clients are:
The money raised from the sale of ex-Police Cars goes back to the police forces selling them. After the auctioneer fee and decommissioning costs it’s considered to be the most cost effective method open to the police when renewing their fleet. This is all good news for the consumer. If you’re willing to overlook some of the cosmetic scarring that can result from decommissioned Police vehicles then you can drive off having made a tidy saving. GAUK Auctions database lists every auctioneer where you can find police cars.
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. Animportant feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: Uniform vs.Discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding thedominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferencesof the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. ... [Show full abstract]Read more
CWS Asset Management and Sales (CWSAMS) is a nationwide company with expertise in the management, marketing and sales of a wide range of assets, specializing in web-based and live auctions. CWSAMS has provided continuous support to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, its legacy agencies, and other public & private entities for the marketing and sale of real and personal property for the past 26 years. An abbreviated list of clients are:

Private sources. In addition to these free government sites, you can use private sites. These sites provide information about federal and local government auctions. Gov-Auctions gives you access to both federal and state auctions. The sites charge a one-time fee of $39.00 for access to their information. Having all auctions on one site can be helpful. If you are launching a serious car search or buy auction cars on a frequent basis, paying to use this site might make financial sense
Banks base all short-term interest rates on the Fed funds rate. A low prime rate helps companies expand and create jobs. Low mortgage rates help people afford more expensive homes. The Fed wanted QE to revive the housing market. Low interest rates also reduce returns on bonds. That turns investors toward stocks and other higher-yielding investments. For all these reasons, low interest rates help boost economic growth.
Depending on the agency, the government may use revenue from auctioned items to support crime-prevention programs, pay restitution to crime victims or purchase new equipment the department needs. "By providing agencies with the ability to dispose of excess assets, GSA benefits taxpayers by eliminating the need to maintain and store the unneeded property while also raising more than $300 million in revenue in just the last two years," a GSA spokesperson said.
Private sources. In addition to these free government sites, you can use private sites. These sites provide information about federal and local government auctions. Gov-Auctions gives you access to both federal and state auctions. The sites charge a one-time fee of $39.00 for access to their information. Having all auctions on one site can be helpful. If you are launching a serious car search or buy auction cars on a frequent basis, paying to use this site might make financial sense
​​ ​Items sold include vehicles, electronics, computers and other miscellaneous property used or acquired by Clark County and participating government agencies. Two sales are conducted concurrently on auction days – one for vehicles and one for miscellaneous items. A preview and pre-registration period opens at the auction site three days prior to every sale. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

The US Department of the Treasury auctions off “seized and forfeited” general property (fancy a Rolex watch or a Fender guitar?), cars (how about a pimped-out Escalade?) and boats. Visit the Treasury’s website to find more information on where and when these auctions are held, plus sign up for alerts and research how much money items have sold for in the past. In addition, the Treasury has real property (RP) auctions for real estate seized through IRS-Criminal Investigation, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Secret Service.


The bids with the lowest discount rates will be accepted first since the government will prefer to pay lower yields to investors. In this case, since the Treasury is looking to raise $9 million, it will accept the bids with the lowest rates up to 5.07%. At this mark, only $2 million of the $3 million bid will be approved. All bids above the 5.07% rate will be accepted, and bids below will be rejected. In effect, this auction is cleared at 5.07%, and all successful competitive and non-competitive bidders receive the 5.07% discount rate.
In some parts of England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries auction by candle began to be used for the sale of goods and leaseholds.[10] In a candle auction, the end of the auction was signaled by the expiration of a candle flame, which was intended to ensure that no one could know exactly when the auction would end and make a last-second bid. Sometimes, other unpredictable processes, such as a footrace, were used in place of the expiration of a candle. This type of auction was first mentioned in 1641 in the records of the House of Lords.[11] The practice rapidly became popular, and in 1660 Samuel Pepys's diary recorded two occasions when the Admiralty sold surplus ships "by an inch of candle". Pepys also relates a hint from a highly successful bidder, who had observed that, just before expiring, a candle-wick always flares up slightly: on seeing this, he would shout his final - and winning - bid. The London Gazette began reporting on the auctioning of artwork at the coffeehouses and taverns of London in the late 17th century.
To finance the public debt, the U.S. Treasury sells bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to institutional and individual investors through public auctions. Treasury auctions occur regularly and have a set schedule. There are three steps to an auction: announcement of the auction, bidding, and issuance of the purchased securities.
The bidding started out fairly tame. Individuals there bought a beat up Impala for $525, a Chevy Astro van for $425, and the shittiest Chrysler PT Cruiser I have ever seen for $300. As for the awesome Ford Escort wagon? Well, it didn’t do so hot, in part, Kevin told me, because it’s so light and has low scrap value, and because parts are in low demand:
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
The 18 City of Los Angeles Official Police Garages (OPGs) hold Lien Sales Auctions. The auctions are open to the public. All vehicles are sold "AS IS, WHERE IS" and with all faults. Seller makes no warranty or refunds. Vehicles are sold in an open competitive bid auction. The highest bidder is the buyer. The auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid or stop the sale of a vehicle. In the event of a dispute, the auctioneer's decision will be final.
Due to the various governmental units that supply the vehicles for auction, there's no single reason for vehicles being brought to auction. Some of the vehicles are confiscated due to the former owner's involvement in drug dealing, smuggling, or fraud, while other vehicles were simply just abandoned. On exception, separate auctions will sometimes be held for very large seizures.
Competitive bidders are not guaranteed to receive securities as bid approval depends on the discount yields that are submitted. A competitive tender is submitted by bigger investors, such as institutional investors. Each bidder is limited to 35% of the amount of the offering per bill auction. Each bid submitted specifies the lowest rate or discount margin that the investor is willing to accept for the debt securities. The bids with the lowest discount rate will be accepted first. The lowest discount rate which meets the supply of debt being sold serves as the “winning” yield or the highest accepted yield, after all non-competitive bids have been subtracted from the total amount of securities offered. All investors who bid at or above the level of the winning yield receives securities with this discount rate. All bidders, competitive and non-competitive, will receive this yield.
Senior auction is a variation on the all-pay auction, and has a defined loser in addition to the winner. The top two bidders must pay their full final bid amounts, and only the highest wins the auction. The intent is to make the high bidders bid above their upper limits. In the final rounds of bidding, when the current losing party has hit their maximum bid, they are encouraged to bid over their maximum (seen as a small loss) to avoid losing their maximum bid with no return (a very large loss).

Real property - Primarily, this consists of developed land with buildings, usually acquired by the federal government for a specific purpose, such as a military base or office building. This also includes some U.S. Forest Service properties, which usually consist of administrative sites and facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) is the federal agency responsible for selling developed surplus property.  

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