Silent auction is a variant of the English auction in which bids are written on a sheet of paper. At the predetermined end of the auction, the highest listed bidder wins the item.[43] This auction is often used in charity events, with many items auctioned simultaneously and "closed" at a common finish time.[43][44] The auction is "silent" in that there is no auctioneer selling individual items,[43] the bidders writing their bids on a bidding sheet often left on a table near the item.[45] At charity auctions, bid sheets usually have a fixed starting amount, predetermined bid increments, and a "guaranteed bid" amount which works the same as a "buy now" amount. Other variations of this type of auction may include sealed bids.[43] The highest bidder pays the price he or she submitted.[43]
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. An important feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: uniform versus discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding the dominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferences of the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. We find that the majority of the issuers/countries in our sample use a discriminatory auction… CONTINUE READING

In some parts of England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries auction by candle began to be used for the sale of goods and leaseholds.[10] In a candle auction, the end of the auction was signaled by the expiration of a candle flame, which was intended to ensure that no one could know exactly when the auction would end and make a last-second bid. Sometimes, other unpredictable processes, such as a footrace, were used in place of the expiration of a candle. This type of auction was first mentioned in 1641 in the records of the House of Lords.[11] The practice rapidly became popular, and in 1660 Samuel Pepys's diary recorded two occasions when the Admiralty sold surplus ships "by an inch of candle". Pepys also relates a hint from a highly successful bidder, who had observed that, just before expiring, a candle-wick always flares up slightly: on seeing this, he would shout his final - and winning - bid. The London Gazette began reporting on the auctioning of artwork at the coffeehouses and taverns of London in the late 17th century.
26-Mar Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 26-Mar Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 26-Mar Germany Auction of 2-year Treasury notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 5-year notes 27-Mar Italy Bills auction 27-Mar Sweden Auction of government bonds 27-Mar Norway Auction of Treasuries 27-Mar Germany Auction of 10-year Federal bonds 28-Mar United States Sale of 7-year notes 28-Mar Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Mar Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 1-Apr Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 2-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 3-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 3-Apr Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 3-Apr Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 4-Apr Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 5-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Apr Norway Auction of Treasury bills 8-Apr France Auction of BTF Treasury notes 9-Apr United States Sale of 3-year notes 9-Apr Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Apr Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 9-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 10-Apr United States Sale of 10-year notes 10-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 10-Apr Norway Auction of Treasuries 11-Apr United States Sale of 30-year bond 11-Apr Italy Bills auction 12-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 12-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 16-Apr Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 18-Apr Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Apr France Index-linked Securities auction 19-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 23-Apr United States Sale of 2-year notes 23-Apr Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 24-Apr United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 24-Apr United States Sale of 5-year notes 24-Apr Italy Zero Coupon/BTPi auction 24-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 25-Apr United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Apr Italy Bills auction 27-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 29-Apr Belgium OLO Auction
Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
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Payment methods. A government auction accepts many modes of payment from credit cards or bank checks to cash. It is recommended to ask the auctioneer about the modes of payment involved before the auction starts. Besides the bidding price of the car, an additional buyer's premium fee is added onto the total. This fee is normally 5 percent of the winning bid
... Bourjade (2009) modified the uniform-price auction rules in allowing the seller to ration bidders and proved that this rules provide a strategic foundation for underpricing when the seller has an interest in ownership dispersion and then many of the so-called "collusive-seeming" equilibria disappear. Brenner et al. (2009) investigated the revealed preferences of the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions and found that the majority of the issuers/countries in our sample use a discriminatory auction mechanism for issuing government debt, and they also concluded that market-oriented eco- Technological and Economic Development of Economy, 2015, 21(1): 96-117 nomies and those that practice common law tend to use a uniform method while economies who are less market oriented and practice civil law tend to use discriminatory price auctions. Holmberg (2009) characterized the Nash equilibrium in a pay-as-bid, divisible-good, pro- curement auction, and compared the offer curves and mark-ups of the derived equilibrium to the results for the SFE of a uniform-price auction. ...
Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
The New York City Police Department regularly holds online auctions to dispose of seized, unclaimed property and vehicles. The Property Clerk Division works with an outside auctioneer, called Property Room, which specializes in items seized by law enforcement agencies across the country. Online auctions include many high-end items, such as jewelry, rare coins, brand-name clothing, and consumer electronics. Vehicles are also available. Participation in online auctions is free and open to the general public.
One way the federal government finances its activities is by the sale of marketable Treasury bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to the public. Marketable securities can be bought, sold or transferred after they are originally issued. Treasury uses an auction process to sell marketable securities and determine their rate, yield, or discount margin. The value of Treasury marketable securities fluctuates with changes in interest rates and market demand. You can participate in an auction and purchase bills, notes, bonds, FRNs, and TIPS directly from the Treasury or you can purchase them through a bank or broker. Marketable securities held in your account can be sold at current market prices through brokers and many financial institutions.
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