Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.


Local police auctions. If you are interested in local police impound car auctions the best way to find information is to call your local police department. They can provide with the dates and details. Under no circumstances should you call 911 for this information. Look in the local blue pages for the non-emergency number. They are also required to run ads in the local newspaper about 90 days prior to the auction. These are often low key ads in the classified section, so finding them may require some searching. Some police departments put auction information online, so you can also search the Internet
Buyout auction is an auction with an additional set price (the 'buyout' price) that any bidder can accept at any time during the auction, thereby immediately ending the auction and winning the item.[29] If no bidder chooses to utilize the buyout option before the end of bidding the highest bidder wins and pays their bid.[29] Buyout options can be either temporary or permanent.[29] In a temporary-buyout auction the option to buy out the auction is not available after the first bid is placed.[29] In a permanent-buyout auction the buyout option remains available throughout the entire auction until the close of bidding.[29] The buyout price can either remain the same throughout the entire auction, or vary throughout according to rules or simply as decided by the seller.[29]
In order to appeal the decision to seize your goods, you will want to write out a Notice of Claim and hand in the appeal personally. Only the individual who owned the goods at the time of seizure is allowed to appeal the decision to seize them. It is well within your right to appeal the decision to take the goods or merchandise you owned while, at the same time, requesting that Customs return the items to you.
These programs are meant to benefit taxpayers as a whole, but could they benefit you, the individual taxpayer? Can you bag a bargain at a government auction? "GSA's goal is to maximize return to the federal government," the GSA spokesperson said. So they're not giving this stuff away. In fact, the government sets "reserves" or minimums for the most valuable property it auctions off. But judging from a wide tour of current government auctions and bids, there are still opportunities to walk away with valuable goods for a great price. Here's a look at who's selling what, where, and for how much.
Whenever bidders at an auction are aware of the identity of the other bidders there is a risk that they will form a "ring" or "pool" and thus manipulate the auction result, a practice known as collusion. By agreeing to bid only against outsiders, never against members of the "ring", competition becomes weaker, which may dramatically affect the final price level. After the end of the official auction an unofficial auction may take place among the "ring" members. The difference in price between the two auctions could then be split among the members. This form of a ring was used as a central plot device in the opening episode of the 1979 British television series The House of Caradus, 'For Love or Money', uncovered by Helena Caradus on her return from Paris.
Bidding. Get some information about the type of bidding that normally occurs at these auctions. Feel free to ask the consultant about the expected price of a particular vehicle. When the auction starts, raise your hand and registration number card high in the air so the auctioneer can see you. Bids can be in increments of $100, $250 or even $500. This will be up to the auctioneer's discretion. Before bidding, remember that once a bid is made it cannot be withdrawn. Once the bid is won then the bid cards must be immediately filled out and signed. If this is not done then the vehicle can be re-offered. The government can reject any bid
The money raised from the sale of ex-Police Cars goes back to the police forces selling them. After the auctioneer fee and decommissioning costs it’s considered to be the most cost effective method open to the police when renewing their fleet. This is all good news for the consumer. If you’re willing to overlook some of the cosmetic scarring that can result from decommissioned Police vehicles then you can drive off having made a tidy saving. GAUK Auctions database lists every auctioneer where you can find police cars.

THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION! TO VISIT THE AUCTION- COPY AND PASTE THE LINK BELOW:http://peoplesonlineauctions.com/auction/349463/active-bidding-coins-police-property-evidence/ There is a 15% buyers premium that will be added to your final purchase price. AUCTION MANAGER: Chelsea (757) 421-2525AUCTION HOST: Peoples Auction Co., Inc.VAF #527 | NCAL #4666  For questions   [ View Full Listing ]
Don't get discouraged with your first auction. It takes a good sense of what a vehicle is worth, and the ability to think fast-plus some luck and common sense-to get a good deal. Watch the seasoned bidders at work to catch the gist of it. If you're a smart bidder, government auctions can be a good place to find an inexpensive second car or work truck. Just remember: any deal that seems to be too good to be true probably is!
U.S. Marshal's Service Auctions : And finally, the U.S. Marshal's service auctions off some true bling as part of its mission to "combat major criminal activity by disrupting and dismantling illegal enterprises" and "depriving criminals of the proceeds of illegal activity." Once again, there is real estate, but also businesses, cash cars, collectibles — and more.
People that are looking for value prices on quality new and used goods can now search, bid, and buy products at a government auction anywhere in the country. Locating a government auction is the only challenge many consumers find. However, a number of companies exist today that provide website links, auction listings and updated details of what is being sold when, where, and how.
The US Department of the Treasury auctions off “seized and forfeited” general property (fancy a Rolex watch or a Fender guitar?), cars (how about a pimped-out Escalade?) and boats. Visit the Treasury’s website to find more information on where and when these auctions are held, plus sign up for alerts and research how much money items have sold for in the past. In addition, the Treasury has real property (RP) auctions for real estate seized through IRS-Criminal Investigation, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Secret Service.
In this article, we will talk about seized goods and what they are. The seizure of goods occurs when a customs officer finds merchandise or goods that are not allowed to be imported. Items that have not been declared may also be seized if the customs officer sees fit to do so. An example of an item that is prohibited, and therefore fit to be seized, is a weapon such as a knife or a firearm.
There will usually be an estimate of what price the lot will fetch. In an ascending open auction it is considered important to get at least a 50-percent increase in the bids from start to finish. To accomplish this, the auctioneer must start the auction by announcing a suggested opening bid (SOB) that is low enough to be immediately accepted by one of the bidders. Once there is an opening bid, there will quickly be several other, higher bids submitted. Experienced auctioneers will often select an SOB that is about 45 percent of the (lowest) estimate. Thus there is a certain margin of safety to ensure that there will indeed be a lively auction with many bids submitted. Several observations indicate that the lower the SOB, the higher the final winning bid. This is due to the increase in the number of bidders attracted by the low SOB.

People were on their cellphones taking bids from afar, others were desperately eyeing the cars to see if the panels and bumper covers were in decent enough shape to make some cash at the current bidding price. Though there were only a handful of folks at this little auction, the dynamic—the subtle things people did to make sure they made a sound buying decision—was enthralling.

MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN: 303190). The registered office address of both MoneySupermarket.com Group PLC and MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited (registered in England No. 3157344) is MoneySupermarket House, St. David's Park, Ewloe, Chester, CH5 3UZ. MoneySavingExpert.com Limited is an appointed representative of MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited.
The process begins several days before the scheduled auction when the Treasury announces the details of the upcoming issue, including the amount to be auctioned and the maturity date. When you participate in an auction, you have two bidding options – competitive and noncompetitive. TreasuryDirect allows noncompetitive bidding only. Noncompetitive bidding is limited to purchases of $5 million per auction. Bidding limits apply cumulatively to all methods (TreasuryDirect, banks, and brokers) that are used for bidding in a single auction. 

Shortly before the start of a new quarter, the Dutch State Treasury Agency (DSTA) announces the issuance calendar for the new quarter. The press release states the bonds and bills that will be issued, the dates of issuance and, for bonds, it contains an indication of the target amounts to be raised. In December the DSTA announces its overall funding plan for the coming year, which is updated in January and on a quarterly basis.
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd, beginning at 11:37 am.  Bidding closes on the first item at 11:37 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: There is no inspection for   [ View Full Listing ]
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
The US Department of the Treasury auctions off “seized and forfeited” general property (fancy a Rolex watch or a Fender guitar?), cars (how about a pimped-out Escalade?) and boats. Visit the Treasury’s website to find more information on where and when these auctions are held, plus sign up for alerts and research how much money items have sold for in the past. In addition, the Treasury has real property (RP) auctions for real estate seized through IRS-Criminal Investigation, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Secret Service.
When you’re in need of a reasonably priced used car, your best and easiest solution is to come to one of our used car auction events — either in person or online. Because our inventory is always being updated, there are lots of options available. Plus, because our prices are so good, you can save a great deal. At our auctions, we sell hundreds of cars for less than $1000 and are always open to the public — the bargains are just waiting for you.
The word "auction" is derived from the Latin augeō, which means "I increase" or "I augment".[1] For most of history, auctions have been a relatively uncommon way to negotiate the exchange of goods and commodities. In practice, both haggling and sale by set-price have been significantly more common.[5] Indeed, before the seventeenth century the few auctions that were held were sporadic.[6]
Participants in any Treasury auction consist of small investors and institutional investors who submit bids categorized as either competitive or non-competitive tenders. Non-competitive tenders are submitted by smaller investors who are guaranteed to receive bills, but they won’t know what discount rate they will receive until the auction closes. In effect, these investors receive no guarantee on the price or discount received. An investor who submits a non-competitive bid agrees to accept whatever discount rate is decided at the auction, determined by the competitive side of the auction which is handled as a Dutch auction. The minimum non-competitive tender for a Treasury bill is $10,000. The non-competitive closing time for bills is normally 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on auction day.
... A US based investor, for example, who is seeking to invest in AAA rated sovereign bonds, linked to the euro, can choose to participate in the German or French government bond auctions that use discriminatory price auctions or in Finland's auctions that use the uniform price mechanism. He also can choose to participate in the Italian government auctions that use both mechanisms or buy Austrian bonds that use none of these auction methods (See Brenner, Galai and Sade, 2009). ...
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Tuesday, March 19th, beginning at 11:07 am Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Thursday, March 14th, 10 am - 2   [ View Full Listing ] 

Silent auction is a variant of the English auction in which bids are written on a sheet of paper. At the predetermined end of the auction, the highest listed bidder wins the item.[43] This auction is often used in charity events, with many items auctioned simultaneously and "closed" at a common finish time.[43][44] The auction is "silent" in that there is no auctioneer selling individual items,[43] the bidders writing their bids on a bidding sheet often left on a table near the item.[45] At charity auctions, bid sheets usually have a fixed starting amount, predetermined bid increments, and a "guaranteed bid" amount which works the same as a "buy now" amount. Other variations of this type of auction may include sealed bids.[43] The highest bidder pays the price he or she submitted.[43]
A primary dealer is a firm that buys government securities directly from a government, with the intention of reselling them to others, thus acting as a market maker of government securities. The government may regulate the behavior and number of its primary dealers and impose conditions of entry. Some governments sell their securities only to primary dealers; some sell them to others as well. Governments that use primary dealers include Belgium, Brazil,[1] Canada, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Singapore, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

In an English auction, a dummy bid is a bid made by a dummy bidder acting in collusion with the auctioneer or vendor, designed to deceive genuine bidders into paying more. In a first-price auction, a dummy bid is an unfavourable bid designed so as not to become the winning bid. (The bidder does not want to win this auction, but he or she wants to make sure to be invited to the next auction).

The word "auction" is derived from the Latin augeō, which means "I increase" or "I augment".[1] For most of history, auctions have been a relatively uncommon way to negotiate the exchange of goods and commodities. In practice, both haggling and sale by set-price have been significantly more common.[5] Indeed, before the seventeenth century the few auctions that were held were sporadic.[6]

Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
From our early days as an online police auction site, there was one piece of property & evidence that we did not touch – firearms. However, recently for many states and jurisdictions it has become a requirement, and even mandated, for law enforcement agencies to auction off their seized, forfeited and unclaimed firearms just as they do with other parts of the property and evidence room.
It is important to have realistic expectations when attending a government car auction. While you can find some good bargains, you are not going to find a brand new BMW for $100.00. Government auctions sell both fleet cars and vehicles that have been impounded by government agencies. The conditions of these vehicles can range from great to not running. Set your expectations and budget realistically.
×