Government, bankruptcy and general auctions are amongst the most common auctions to be found today. A government auction is simply an auction held on behalf of a government body generally at a general sale. Here one may find a vast range of materials that have to be sold by various government bodies, for example: HM Customs & Excise, the Official Receiver, the Ministry of Defence, local councils and authorities, liquidators, as well as material put up for auction by companies and members of the public. Also in this group you will find auctions ordered by executors who are entering the assets of individuals who have perhaps died in testate (those who have died without leaving a will), or in debt. One of the most interesting bodies to look out for at auction is HM Customs & Excise who may be entering at auction various items seized from smugglers, fraudsters and racketeers.
Silent auction is a variant of the English auction in which bids are written on a sheet of paper. At the predetermined end of the auction, the highest listed bidder wins the item.[43] This auction is often used in charity events, with many items auctioned simultaneously and "closed" at a common finish time.[43][44] The auction is "silent" in that there is no auctioneer selling individual items,[43] the bidders writing their bids on a bidding sheet often left on a table near the item.[45] At charity auctions, bid sheets usually have a fixed starting amount, predetermined bid increments, and a "guaranteed bid" amount which works the same as a "buy now" amount. Other variations of this type of auction may include sealed bids.[43] The highest bidder pays the price he or she submitted.[43]
The Auction Catalog has been prepared as a guide, and should be used as a guide only. Although the descriptions are believed to be correct its accuracy cannot be guaranteed or warranted. The Bidder acknowledges that all auction items are available for inspection prior to the auction and it is the Bidders responsibility to have inspected the item before bidding. No sale shall be invalidated; nor shall auctioneers be liable as a result of defects or inaccuracies of any lot.
The process begins several days before the scheduled auction when the Treasury announces the details of the upcoming issue, including the amount to be auctioned and the maturity date. When you participate in an auction, you have two bidding options – competitive and noncompetitive. TreasuryDirect allows noncompetitive bidding only. Noncompetitive bidding is limited to purchases of $5 million per auction. Bidding limits apply cumulatively to all methods (TreasuryDirect, banks, and brokers) that are used for bidding in a single auction.
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!

The US Department of the Treasury auctions off “seized and forfeited” general property (fancy a Rolex watch or a Fender guitar?), cars (how about a pimped-out Escalade?) and boats. Visit the Treasury’s website to find more information on where and when these auctions are held, plus sign up for alerts and research how much money items have sold for in the past. In addition, the Treasury has real property (RP) auctions for real estate seized through IRS-Criminal Investigation, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Secret Service.


An auction is a process of buying and selling goods or services by offering them up for bid, taking bids, and then selling the item to the highest bidder. The open ascending price auction is arguably the most common form of auction in use today.[1] Participants bid openly against one another, with each subsequent bid required to be higher than the previous bid.[2] An auctioneer may announce prices, bidders may call out their bids themselves (or have a proxy call out a bid on their behalf), or bids may be submitted electronically with the highest current bid publicly displayed.[2] In a Dutch auction, the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] While auctions are most associated in the public imagination with the sale of antiques, paintings, rare collectibles and expensive wines, auctions are also used for commodities, livestock, radio spectrum and used cars. In economic theory, an auction may refer to any mechanism or set of trading rules for exchange.
An announcement is released several days before the bill auction to kickstart the process. The announcement includes information such as the auction date, issue date, amount of security that will be sold, bidding close times, participation eligibility, etc. All auctions are open to the public through Treasury Direct or the Treasury Automated Auction Processing System (TAAPS).

All diesel vehicles and equipment operated in California may be subject to the California Air Resources Board (ARB) regulation to reduce emissions of air pollutants. Therefore, these items could be subject to exhaust retrofit or accelerated turnover requirements to reduce emissions of air pollutants. For more information, buyers may visit the ARB website at http://.arb.ca.gov/dieseltruck. Compliance with these regulations and all cost associated with meeting ARB requirements shall be the sole responsibility of the buyer.
Bid NOW http://baileyshonor.com/auctions/2019/OL190321/details.htm Over 70 pieces of Roseville Pottery, 25 lots of vintage colored plastic table top radios and transistors, Over 35 lots of antique and vintage clocks (mantle and alarm), nice painted primitive cupboards and cabinets including corner cabinets and pie safe, Shaker and Deacon benches, Hoosier style kitchen cupboards, 60" HD 3D   [ View Full Listing ]
GAUK Police Auctions & Sales category lists everything you need in an easy to read page outlining all the details of Police Auctions within the UK. In an attempt to stop the lost and found departments becoming crammed and to reduce the number of items stored in the Police Property Store UK police forces sell consignments of stolen and recovered and seized goods through a Police Auction. These sales include vehicles, bicycles, clothing, electronics, furniture and many other items, which end up in the police property room.
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd 12:07 pm Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Friday, March 15th 9am to 2pm  INSPECT:   [ View Full Listing ]
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One way the federal government finances its activities is by the sale of marketable Treasury bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to the public. Marketable securities can be bought, sold or transferred after they are originally issued. Treasury uses an auction process to sell marketable securities and determine their rate, yield, or discount margin. The value of Treasury marketable securities fluctuates with changes in interest rates and market demand. You can participate in an auction and purchase bills, notes, bonds, FRNs, and TIPS directly from the Treasury or you can purchase them through a bank or broker. Marketable securities held in your account can be sold at current market prices through brokers and many financial institutions.
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