In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
Real property - Primarily, this consists of developed land with buildings, usually acquired by the federal government for a specific purpose, such as a military base or office building. This also includes some U.S. Forest Service properties, which usually consist of administrative sites and facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) is the federal agency responsible for selling developed surplus property.  
MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN: 303190). The registered office address of both MoneySupermarket.com Group PLC and MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited (registered in England No. 3157344) is MoneySupermarket House, St. David's Park, Ewloe, Chester, CH5 3UZ. MoneySavingExpert.com Limited is an appointed representative of MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited.
The first known auction house in the world was Stockholm Auction House, Sweden (Stockholms Auktionsverk), founded by Baron Claes Rålamb in 1674.[12][13] Sotheby's, currently the world's second-largest auction house,[12] was founded in London on 11 March 1744, when Samuel Baker presided over the disposal of "several hundred scarce and valuable" books from the library of an acquaintance. Christie's, now the world's largest auction house,[12] was founded by James Christie in 1766 in London[14] and published its first auction catalog in that year, although newspaper advertisements of Christie's sales dating from 1759 have been found.[15]
CWS Asset Management and Sales (CWSAMS) is a nationwide company with expertise in the management, marketing and sales of a wide range of assets, specializing in web-based and live auctions. CWSAMS has provided continuous support to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, its legacy agencies, and other public & private entities for the marketing and sale of real and personal property for the past 26 years. An abbreviated list of clients are:
Silent auction is a variant of the English auction in which bids are written on a sheet of paper. At the predetermined end of the auction, the highest listed bidder wins the item.[43] This auction is often used in charity events, with many items auctioned simultaneously and "closed" at a common finish time.[43][44] The auction is "silent" in that there is no auctioneer selling individual items,[43] the bidders writing their bids on a bidding sheet often left on a table near the item.[45] At charity auctions, bid sheets usually have a fixed starting amount, predetermined bid increments, and a "guaranteed bid" amount which works the same as a "buy now" amount. Other variations of this type of auction may include sealed bids.[43] The highest bidder pays the price he or she submitted.[43]
Auctioneers are normally contracted by the different organisations within their local area. An auction at the centre of London for example, will deal with the assets of companies whose bankruptcy proceedings are being dealt with by courts in Greater London. An auction in Leeds will handle the assets of companies in Yorkshire that are being dealt with by Leeds City Court.
In an English auction, a dummy bid is a bid made by a dummy bidder acting in collusion with the auctioneer or vendor, designed to deceive genuine bidders into paying more. In a first-price auction, a dummy bid is an unfavourable bid designed so as not to become the winning bid. (The bidder does not want to win this auction, but he or she wants to make sure to be invited to the next auction).
There will usually be an estimate of what price the lot will fetch. In an ascending open auction it is considered important to get at least a 50-percent increase in the bids from start to finish. To accomplish this, the auctioneer must start the auction by announcing a suggested opening bid (SOB) that is low enough to be immediately accepted by one of the bidders. Once there is an opening bid, there will quickly be several other, higher bids submitted. Experienced auctioneers will often select an SOB that is about 45 percent of the (lowest) estimate. Thus there is a certain margin of safety to ensure that there will indeed be a lively auction with many bids submitted. Several observations indicate that the lower the SOB, the higher the final winning bid. This is due to the increase in the number of bidders attracted by the low SOB.
In order to appeal the decision to seize your goods, you will want to write out a Notice of Claim and hand in the appeal personally. Only the individual who owned the goods at the time of seizure is allowed to appeal the decision to seize them. It is well within your right to appeal the decision to take the goods or merchandise you owned while, at the same time, requesting that Customs return the items to you.
These programs are meant to benefit taxpayers as a whole, but could they benefit you, the individual taxpayer? Can you bag a bargain at a government auction? "GSA's goal is to maximize return to the federal government," the GSA spokesperson said. So they're not giving this stuff away. In fact, the government sets "reserves" or minimums for the most valuable property it auctions off. But judging from a wide tour of current government auctions and bids, there are still opportunities to walk away with valuable goods for a great price. Here's a look at who's selling what, where, and for how much.
DATE COUNTRY AUCTION DETAILS 7-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 7-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 8-Jan United States Sale of 3-year notes 8-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Jan Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 8-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 8-Jan Netherlands DSL Auction 9-Jan United States Sale of 10-year notes 9-Jan Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Jan Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 10-Jan United States Sale of 30-year bond 10-Jan Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 10-Jan Italy Bills auction 11-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 11-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 15-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 16-Jan Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 16-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 16-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 17-Jan Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 21-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 21-Jan Belgium OLO Auction 21-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 24-Jan Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 24-Jan Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 25-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Jan Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 28-Jan United States Sale of 2-year notes 28-Jan United States Sale of 5-year notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 7-year notes 29-Jan Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 29-Jan Italy Bills auction 30-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 30-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 30-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 31-Jan Japan 2-year discount bill auction 1-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 4-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 4-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 5-Feb United States Sale of 3-year notes 5-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 5-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 6-Feb United States Sale of 10-year notes 6-Feb Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 7-Feb United States Sale of 30-year bond 7-Feb Japan 6-month discount bill auction 7-Feb Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 7-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 8-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 12-Feb Italy Bills auction 12-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 13-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 13-Feb Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 13-Feb Sweden Auction of government bonds 13-Feb Norway Auction of Treasuries 15-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 15-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year Inflation-Indexed Bonds 18-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 18-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 19-Feb Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Feb Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Feb United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 21-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 22-Feb Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 22-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Feb United States Sale of 2-year notes 25-Feb United States Sale of 5-year notes 26-Feb United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Feb Italy Bills auction 27-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Feb Japan 2-year discount bill auction
Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house
YP - The Real Yellow PagesSM - helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business's suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.
THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION! TO VISIT THE AUCTION- COPY AND PASTE THE LINK BELOW:http://peoplesonlineauctions.com/auction/349463/active-bidding-coins-police-property-evidence/ There is a 15% buyers premium that will be added to your final purchase price. AUCTION MANAGER: Chelsea (757) 421-2525AUCTION HOST: Peoples Auction Co., Inc.VAF #527 | NCAL #4666  For questions   [ View Full Listing ]
Policeauctions.com is run by a private company and is not affiliated with the government. It provides information and links to government-run auctions, but the site itself is part of the wholesale liquidation auction market. Items are sold as is and sometimes there are fees. You have to register to bid and get information, but it doesn’t cost anything to join the site.
If for any reason, Auctioneer is unable to make available or deliver any purchase or clear title to the same, or documentation required in respect of any purchase, whether before or after delivery, Auctioneer’s sole liability shall be the return of monies paid in respect of such purchase upon its return by purchaser. Any such purchase shall be returned or surrendered upon demand by Auctioneer.
×