Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. An important feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: uniform versus discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding the dominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferences of the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. We find that the majority of the issuers/countries in our sample use a discriminatory auction… CONTINUE READING

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Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information
Internet auctions typically last seven days, and operate like eBay auctions. Each listing links to the auction house website where bids can be placed. From that site, bidders are asked to register in order to bid on a vehicle. Live auctions are public auctions held at a specific date and location and are usually published in newspapers in addition to the online listing at GovSales.

We are a premier full-service private auction company liquidating property seized by police and federal agencies, property from abandoned safe deposit boxes, seized bank assets, bankruptcies, financial institutions, business inventory liquidations, and other consignors. Our firm conducts traditional live auctions throughout the year at various locations across the country, as well as auctions on the Internet. Please see our schedule of upcoming auctions for further details.
This site advertises auctions of seized Real Property for sale throughout the United States and Puerto Rico and includes single and multi-family residences; commercial and residential land; commercial buildings and warehouses; and operating businesses. These properties have been seized and forfeited due to violations of federal laws enforced by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Participating enforcement agencies include: IRS-Criminal Investigations Division, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the U.S. Secret Service. All proceeds from the sale of property are deposited in the U.S. Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund. This fund helps support continued law enforcement efforts and provide restitution to crime victims.
Internet auctions typically last seven days, and operate like eBay auctions. Each listing links to the auction house website where bids can be placed. From that site, bidders are asked to register in order to bid on a vehicle. Live auctions are public auctions held at a specific date and location and are usually published in newspapers in addition to the online listing at GovSales.
Law enforcement has the ability to seize or confiscate the property of criminals, or property used by criminals or their associates for the purpose of conducting illegal activity. For example, a person convicted of drug trafficking or the selling of stolen property will forfeit their vehicles and any other property that is used to perpetuate illegal activity or was obtained by the proceeds of that illegal activity. When a vehicle is seized, it's held by the agency until the time of auction.
The first known auction house in the world was Stockholm Auction House, Sweden (Stockholms Auktionsverk), founded by Baron Claes Rålamb in 1674.[12][13] Sotheby's, currently the world's second-largest auction house,[12] was founded in London on 11 March 1744, when Samuel Baker presided over the disposal of "several hundred scarce and valuable" books from the library of an acquaintance. Christie's, now the world's largest auction house,[12] was founded by James Christie in 1766 in London[14] and published its first auction catalog in that year, although newspaper advertisements of Christie's sales dating from 1759 have been found.[15]
Treasury Department Auctions:  The other agency very active in holding auctions is the Treasury Department, with roughly 300 sales per year. Treasury often offers in-person previews in California, Florida, New Jersey and Texas. Treasury auctions off "property forfeited as a result of violations of federal law enforced by the Department of Treasury or nonpayment of Internal Revenue Service taxes," according to its website. There are many categories of goods, including concrete items like antiques and coins but also less tangible property like stocks and patents.
Buyout auction is an auction with an additional set price (the 'buyout' price) that any bidder can accept at any time during the auction, thereby immediately ending the auction and winning the item.[29] If no bidder chooses to utilize the buyout option before the end of bidding the highest bidder wins and pays their bid.[29] Buyout options can be either temporary or permanent.[29] In a temporary-buyout auction the option to buy out the auction is not available after the first bid is placed.[29] In a permanent-buyout auction the buyout option remains available throughout the entire auction until the close of bidding.[29] The buyout price can either remain the same throughout the entire auction, or vary throughout according to rules or simply as decided by the seller.[29]
Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information
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