Payment methods. A government auction accepts many modes of payment from credit cards or bank checks to cash. It is recommended to ask the auctioneer about the modes of payment involved before the auction starts. Besides the bidding price of the car, an additional buyer's premium fee is added onto the total. This fee is normally 5 percent of the winning bid

An auction is a process of buying and selling goods or services by offering them up for bid, taking bids, and then selling the item to the highest bidder. The open ascending price auction is arguably the most common form of auction in use today.[1] Participants bid openly against one another, with each subsequent bid required to be higher than the previous bid.[2] An auctioneer may announce prices, bidders may call out their bids themselves (or have a proxy call out a bid on their behalf), or bids may be submitted electronically with the highest current bid publicly displayed.[2] In a Dutch auction, the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] While auctions are most associated in the public imagination with the sale of antiques, paintings, rare collectibles and expensive wines, auctions are also used for commodities, livestock, radio spectrum and used cars. In economic theory, an auction may refer to any mechanism or set of trading rules for exchange.

Walrasian auction or Walrasian tâtonnement is an auction in which the auctioneer takes bids from both buyers and sellers in a market of multiple goods.[46] The auctioneer progressively either raises or drops the current proposed price depending on the bids of both buyers and sellers, the auction concluding when supply and demand exactly balance.[47] As a high price tends to dampen demand while a low price tends to increase demand, in theory there is a particular price somewhere in the middle where supply and demand will match.[46] 

Local police auctions. If you are interested in local police impound car auctions the best way to find information is to call your local police department. They can provide with the dates and details. Under no circumstances should you call 911 for this information. Look in the local blue pages for the non-emergency number. They are also required to run ads in the local newspaper about 90 days prior to the auction. These are often low key ads in the classified section, so finding them may require some searching. Some police departments put auction information online, so you can also search the Internet


Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information
Reserve auction is an auction where the item for sale may not be sold if the final bid is not high enough to satisfy the seller; that is, the seller reserves the right to accept or reject the highest bid.[37] In these cases a set 'reserve' price known to the auctioneer, but not necessarily to the bidders, may have been set, below which the item may not be sold.[36] If the seller announces to the bidders the reserve price, it is a public reserve price auction.[39] In contrast, if the seller does not announce the reserve price before the sale but only after the sale, it is a secret reserve price auction.[40] The reserve price may be fixed or discretionary. In the latter case, the decision to accept a bid is deferred to the auctioneer, who may accept a bid that is marginally below it. A reserve auction is safer for the seller than a no-reserve auction as they are not required to accept a low bid, but this could result in a lower final price if less interest is generated in the sale.[37]
When goods are seized, the importer received what is known as a Notice of Seizure. This document lists the items that have been seized by customs, as well as details regarding who to contact about the seized goods, and information on what to do after your items have been taken. If the items are seized in your presence, the reasoning behind why your items have been seized will be explained to you in person. Otherwise, the Notice of Seizure will be sent to you.
Senior auction is a variation on the all-pay auction, and has a defined loser in addition to the winner. The top two bidders must pay their full final bid amounts, and only the highest wins the auction. The intent is to make the high bidders bid above their upper limits. In the final rounds of bidding, when the current losing party has hit their maximum bid, they are encouraged to bid over their maximum (seen as a small loss) to avoid losing their maximum bid with no return (a very large loss).
The first known auction house in the world was Stockholm Auction House, Sweden (Stockholms Auktionsverk), founded by Baron Claes Rålamb in 1674.[12][13] Sotheby's, currently the world's second-largest auction house,[12] was founded in London on 11 March 1744, when Samuel Baker presided over the disposal of "several hundred scarce and valuable" books from the library of an acquaintance. Christie's, now the world's largest auction house,[12] was founded by James Christie in 1766 in London[14] and published its first auction catalog in that year, although newspaper advertisements of Christie's sales dating from 1759 have been found.[15]
Police Auctions are a time-proven and established route used by Police forces across the country to dispose of proceeds of crime, lost and found, seized, unclaimed stolen and confiscated property. Police sales are held on a regular basis at auction houses and venues all over the UK. Our comprehensive Police Auction database covers ALL sales going on right now and details hundreds of auction lots every, single day. GAUK Police Auctions section shares with you ‘insider’ information on all the events!

At Capital Auto Auction, we buy, sell and accept donations of used vehicles of various kinds. Whether it's for cars, boats or fleets of vehicles, we make it our goal to work out arrangements that satisfy both buyers and sellers. Our live auctions take place in four locations: Manchester, New Hampshire; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Temple Hills, Maryland; and Washington, DC. Our online auctions make it possible for you to bid on cars from your computer or smartphone. Also, in addition to hosting weekly auctions, we accept vehicles on consignments, doing all the advertising and networking to help you get a car sold.
The money raised from the sale of ex-Police Cars goes back to the police forces selling them. After the auctioneer fee and decommissioning costs it’s considered to be the most cost effective method open to the police when renewing their fleet. This is all good news for the consumer. If you’re willing to overlook some of the cosmetic scarring that can result from decommissioned Police vehicles then you can drive off having made a tidy saving. GAUK Auctions database lists every auctioneer where you can find police cars.
Katehakis and Puranam provided the first model[62] for the problem of optimal bidding for a firm that in each period procures items to meet a random demand by participating in a finite sequence of auctions. In this model an item valuation derives from the sale of the acquired items via their demand distribution, sale price, acquisition cost, salvage value and lost sales. They established monotonicity properties for the value function and the optimal dynamic bid policy. They also provided a model[63] for the case in which the buyer must acquire a fixed number of items either at a fixed buy-it-now price in the open market or by participating in a sequence of auctions. The objective of the buyer is to minimize his expected total cost for acquiring the fixed number of items.
... cdebt.treas.gov 2 Krishna (2002), among others, analyzes the uniform auction in which the uniform price is the highest losing bid, the multi-unit version of a second price auction. We analyze the uniform auction with the price set to the lowest winning bid because that is what Treasuries use; it is the multi-unit version of the first-price auction. Brenner et al (2009) surveyed 48 countries, of which 24 used the discriminatory format and 9 the uniform format. tion, which in turn is higher than the low bid in the uniform auction. For both auction formats, bidders shade their bids with respect to the expected value of the good, conditional on the signal observation, for all signals but the lowest. We ch ...
The New York City Police Department regularly holds online auctions to dispose of seized, unclaimed property and vehicles. The Property Clerk Division works with an outside auctioneer, called Property Room, which specializes in items seized by law enforcement agencies across the country. Online auctions include many high-end items, such as jewelry, rare coins, brand-name clothing, and consumer electronics. Vehicles are also available. Participation in online auctions is free and open to the general public.
Local police auctions. If you are interested in local police impound car auctions the best way to find information is to call your local police department. They can provide with the dates and details. Under no circumstances should you call 911 for this information. Look in the local blue pages for the non-emergency number. They are also required to run ads in the local newspaper about 90 days prior to the auction. These are often low key ads in the classified section, so finding them may require some searching. Some police departments put auction information online, so you can also search the Internet
Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. An important feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: Uniform vs. Discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding the dominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferences of the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. We find that the majority of the issuers/countries in our sample use a discriminatory auction mechanism for issuing government debt. We use a multinomial logit procedure and discriminatory analysis to investigate the mechanism choice. It was interesting to find that market oriented economies and those that practice Common law tend to use a uniform method while economies who are less market oriented and practice Civil law tend to use discriminatory price auctions.
If for any reason, Auctioneer is unable to make available or deliver any purchase or clear title to the same, or documentation required in respect of any purchase, whether before or after delivery, Auctioneer’s sole liability shall be the return of monies paid in respect of such purchase upon its return by purchaser. Any such purchase shall be returned or surrendered upon demand by Auctioneer.
Police auctions tend to conjure up images of beat up cars confiscated from drug dealers and mint condition police cruisers that—for one reason or another—never saw service. The reality lies somewhere in the middle, and there are some good deals to be had so long as you're careful, and absolutely sure about what you're doing. Let this list be your insurance.

Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.
The State of Georgia primarily offers surplus state property to the public through internet auction providers. Click on the square below to see property that is currently being offered on each site. To place bids on these auction sites, you must first set up a user account. To set up a user account, click on the desired auction site under Areas of Focus and follow the sites' instructions.
Private treaty sales – Occasionally, when looking at an auction catalogue some of the items have been withdrawn. Usually these goods have been sold by 'private treaty'. This means that the goods have already been sold off, usually to a trader or dealer on a private, behind-the-scenes basis before they have had a chance to be offered at the auction sale. These goods are rarely in single lots – photocopiers or fax machines would generally be sold in bulk lots.
I returned home wishing I had never gone to this auction, because as someone trying to get over his junky-vehicle hoarding tendencies, I’m not strong enough to handle this kind of temptation. Sure, many of these cars were junk, but they were dirt cheap. And since most were impounded for some sort of driving infraction, there’s a decent chance they move under their own power. 

Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
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Private treaty sales – Occasionally, when looking at an auction catalogue some of the items have been withdrawn. Usually these goods have been sold by 'private treaty'. This means that the goods have already been sold off, usually to a trader or dealer on a private, behind-the-scenes basis before they have had a chance to be offered at the auction sale. These goods are rarely in single lots – photocopiers or fax machines would generally be sold in bulk lots.
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Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.

Whenever bidders at an auction are aware of the identity of the other bidders there is a risk that they will form a "ring" or "pool" and thus manipulate the auction result, a practice known as collusion. By agreeing to bid only against outsiders, never against members of the "ring", competition becomes weaker, which may dramatically affect the final price level. After the end of the official auction an unofficial auction may take place among the "ring" members. The difference in price between the two auctions could then be split among the members. This form of a ring was used as a central plot device in the opening episode of the 1979 British television series The House of Caradus, 'For Love or Money', uncovered by Helena Caradus on her return from Paris.
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