Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1] 

The goods found at Police Auction can be brand new or graded from A down in used condition. Goods may be slightly marked a good example would be high quality push-bikes which still retain a good value. All items listed in any Police Auction are available for viewing and inspection prior to the sale. If faulty or damaged the fact is clearly mentioned on the item and faults will be outlined by the auctioneer during the auction. If this is an Online Police Auction the description should be clear and accurate. These auction events are a prime location for bargain hunters. Many of the goods will be sold for extremely low prices and almost always under market value. Remember, these goods are at auction TO BE SOLD, the police forces need to clear their stores regardless of how low the highest bid for the items at the Police Auction.
The District of Columbia now auctions its surplus property online through GovDeals, a Liquidity Services, Inc. marketplace. The district awarded the contract for the management of the inventory, appraisal, sale and shipping of the city's surplus property to Liquidity Services Inc. LSI conducts auctions of city assets such as vehicles, police automobile accessories, computer equipment, radios and other communications equipment, office furniture and other supplies through its online marketplace. The auctions are expected to improve data tracking and financial oversight of the city's surplus asset disposition activities.
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
In order to appeal the decision to seize your goods, you will want to write out a Notice of Claim and hand in the appeal personally. Only the individual who owned the goods at the time of seizure is allowed to appeal the decision to seize them. It is well within your right to appeal the decision to take the goods or merchandise you owned while, at the same time, requesting that Customs return the items to you.
At Capital Auto Auction, we buy, sell and accept donations of used vehicles of various kinds. Whether it's for cars, boats or fleets of vehicles, we make it our goal to work out arrangements that satisfy both buyers and sellers. Our live auctions take place in four locations: Manchester, New Hampshire; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Temple Hills, Maryland; and Washington, DC. Our online auctions make it possible for you to bid on cars from your computer or smartphone. Also, in addition to hosting weekly auctions, we accept vehicles on consignments, doing all the advertising and networking to help you get a car sold. 

Don't get discouraged with your first auction. It takes a good sense of what a vehicle is worth, and the ability to think fast-plus some luck and common sense-to get a good deal. Watch the seasoned bidders at work to catch the gist of it. If you're a smart bidder, government auctions can be a good place to find an inexpensive second car or work truck. Just remember: any deal that seems to be too good to be true probably is!
Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house

Treasury Department Auctions:  The other agency very active in holding auctions is the Treasury Department, with roughly 300 sales per year. Treasury often offers in-person previews in California, Florida, New Jersey and Texas. Treasury auctions off "property forfeited as a result of violations of federal law enforced by the Department of Treasury or nonpayment of Internal Revenue Service taxes," according to its website. There are many categories of goods, including concrete items like antiques and coins but also less tangible property like stocks and patents.


Municipal Vehicle and Equipment Auction ends March 24th 2019 - online only auctionVehicles located at 835 Route 100 Bechtelsville, PA 19505Inspection and Previews - Saturday March 9th and March 23rd 9am-4pm View the catalog and bid online at geyerauctions.hibid.com 1982 American LaFrance Fire Truck - Turbocharged V8 Detriot Diesel  with 13,000original miles Allison Automatic, Garage Kept   [ View Full Listing ]
A listing of vehicles up for auction will be posted on this website as soon as it becomes available. Flyers containing a vehicle listing for this auction will be available at the Impound Section as soon as we can produce them. Some vehicles may not be listed on the internet, only on the flyer. Please do not call the Impound Section for vehicle information.
Any dispute arising as to any bidding shall be settled by Auctioneer at his sole discretion, and Auctioneer may put the lot in dispute up for sale again. Auctioneer reserves the right to refuse any bid, which it considers to be an insignificant advance over the preceding bid. No person shall bid on any lot of which he is the Consignor, agent, associate, or on behalf of the Consignor.
Do your research. Check Kelly Blue Book for the proper price for the vehicle, including its mileage and apparent condition. Always downgrade the condition by one ranking for government auctions. Also, do some smart used-car research, such as checking Consumer Reports for reliability and the frequencies of particular repairs, and checking our road test information if it's a recent model vehicle.
The following link will take you to the sale list for the next abandoned & confiscated vehicle auction. Be advised that some of these vehicles will not be present on the day of sale, as owners/lien holders will have reclaimed the vehicles. You must be present at the sale preview to know what remaining vehicles will be offered and to view vehicle conditions.
Seized Assets Auctioneers is excited to invite you to bid on our wonderful collection of luxury items. Our auction house is committed to giving you the chance to win lots of amazing items at a fraction of retail cost. Jewelry, currency, art, fashion, cars, and rare memorabilia, WE HAVE IT ALL! Our auctions start every day at 9AM PST! Bid early and bid often!! We'll see you on the auction block!
Seized Assets Auctioneers is excited to invite you to bid on our wonderful collection of luxury items. Our auction house is committed to giving you the chance to win lots of amazing items at a fraction of retail cost. Jewelry, currency, art, fashion, cars, and rare memorabilia, WE HAVE IT ALL! Our auctions start every day at 9AM PST! Bid early and bid often!! We'll see you on the auction block!
There will usually be an estimate of what price the lot will fetch. In an ascending open auction it is considered important to get at least a 50-percent increase in the bids from start to finish. To accomplish this, the auctioneer must start the auction by announcing a suggested opening bid (SOB) that is low enough to be immediately accepted by one of the bidders. Once there is an opening bid, there will quickly be several other, higher bids submitted. Experienced auctioneers will often select an SOB that is about 45 percent of the (lowest) estimate. Thus there is a certain margin of safety to ensure that there will indeed be a lively auction with many bids submitted. Several observations indicate that the lower the SOB, the higher the final winning bid. This is due to the increase in the number of bidders attracted by the low SOB. 

Bidding fee auction, also known as a penny auction, often requires that each participant must pay a fixed price to place each bid, typically one penny (hence the name) higher than the current bid. When an auction's time expires, the highest bidder wins the item and must pay a final bid price.[27] Unlike in a conventional auction, the final price is typically much lower than the value of the item, but all bidders (not just the winner) will have paid for each bid placed; the winner will buy the item at a very low price (plus price of rights-to-bid used), all the losers will have paid, and the seller will typically receive significantly more than the value of the item.[28]
From our early days as an online police auction site, there was one piece of property & evidence that we did not touch – firearms. However, recently for many states and jurisdictions it has become a requirement, and even mandated, for law enforcement agencies to auction off their seized, forfeited and unclaimed firearms just as they do with other parts of the property and evidence room.
To bid, you'll mostly need to go to an auction house on the day and bid in person. However, some auction houses now offer live internet or telephone bidding. You'll have to register to bid with the auction house, whether you're bidding in person or not. You should be able to find out when the next police auction will be held by visiting the auction house's website.
Local police auctions. If you are interested in local police impound car auctions the best way to find information is to call your local police department. They can provide with the dates and details. Under no circumstances should you call 911 for this information. Look in the local blue pages for the non-emergency number. They are also required to run ads in the local newspaper about 90 days prior to the auction. These are often low key ads in the classified section, so finding them may require some searching. Some police departments put auction information online, so you can also search the Internet
Local police auctions. If you are interested in local police impound car auctions the best way to find information is to call your local police department. They can provide with the dates and details. Under no circumstances should you call 911 for this information. Look in the local blue pages for the non-emergency number. They are also required to run ads in the local newspaper about 90 days prior to the auction. These are often low key ads in the classified section, so finding them may require some searching. Some police departments put auction information online, so you can also search the Internet 

Buying the confiscated goods either from the TSA or individual states is done in auctions 90% of the time. Some confiscated items are put up directly for sale though, and you can find it on the websites for direct purchase. The state surplus auctions are held regularly, and if you're planning to show up for it, it's definitely best to check if you have to register beforehand. Several states require this.
Participants in any Treasury auction consist of small investors and institutional investors who submit bids categorized as either competitive or non-competitive tenders. Non-competitive tenders are submitted by smaller investors who are guaranteed to receive bills, but they won’t know what discount rate they will receive until the auction closes. In effect, these investors receive no guarantee on the price or discount received. An investor who submits a non-competitive bid agrees to accept whatever discount rate is decided at the auction, determined by the competitive side of the auction which is handled as a Dutch auction. The minimum non-competitive tender for a Treasury bill is $10,000. The non-competitive closing time for bills is normally 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on auction day.
Pursuant to the Dallas City Charter, all items that exceed $20,000 threshold requires the City of Dallas, City Council approval and will require the bidder to have a hold place on the item(s) purchased for approximately 6 to 8 weeks prior to delivery (Pending city councils approval). In addition, the City of Dallas reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
The relationship between the Fed and the primary dealers is governed by the Primary Dealers Act of 1988 and the Fed's operating policy "Administration of Relationships with Primary Dealers."[6] Primary dealers purchase the vast majority of the U.S. Treasury securities (T-bills, T-notes, and T-bonds) sold at auction, and resell them to the public. Their activities extend well beyond the Treasury market. For example, according to the Wall Street Journal Europe (2/9/06 p. 20), all of the top ten dealers in the foreign exchange market are also primary dealers, and between them account for almost 73% of foreign exchange trading volume. Arguably, this group's members are the most influential and powerful non-governmental institutions in global financial markets. Group membership changes slowly, with the current list available from the New York Fed.[2]

The District of Columbia now auctions its surplus property online through GovDeals, a Liquidity Services, Inc. marketplace. The district awarded the contract for the management of the inventory, appraisal, sale and shipping of the city's surplus property to Liquidity Services Inc. LSI conducts auctions of city assets such as vehicles, police automobile accessories, computer equipment, radios and other communications equipment, office furniture and other supplies through its online marketplace. The auctions are expected to improve data tracking and financial oversight of the city's surplus asset disposition activities.


A listing of vehicles up for auction will be posted on this website as soon as it becomes available. Flyers containing a vehicle listing for this auction will be available at the Impound Section as soon as we can produce them. Some vehicles may not be listed on the internet, only on the flyer. Please do not call the Impound Section for vehicle information.
YP - The Real Yellow PagesSM - helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business's suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. Animportant feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: Uniform vs.Discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding thedominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferencesof the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. ... [Show full abstract]Read more

Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
This is the practice, especially by high-end art auctioneers,[64] of raising false bids at crucial times in the bidding in order to create the appearance of greater demand or to extend bidding momentum for a work on offer. To call out these nonexistent bids auctioneers might fix their gaze at a point in the auction room that is difficult for the audience to pin down.[65] The practice is frowned upon in the industry.[65] In the United States, chandelier bidding is not illegal. In fact, an auctioneer may bid up the price of an item to the reserve price, which is an unstated amount the consignor will not sell the item for. However, the auction house is required to disclose this information.
We created a solution for law enforcement agencies nationwide. We pick-up all those seized, stolen, abandoned and surplus goods out of their Property Room, open up their public auctions nationwide and send back proceeds to the local communities. That’s also where we got our name – the Property & Evidence Room is where all these goods are stored at your local law enforcement agencies. We just shortened it to just PropertyRoom.com.
Law enforcement has the ability to seize or confiscate the property of criminals, or property used by criminals or their associates for the purpose of conducting illegal activity. For example, a person convicted of drug trafficking or the selling of stolen property will forfeit their vehicles and any other property that is used to perpetuate illegal activity or was obtained by the proceeds of that illegal activity. When a vehicle is seized, it's held by the agency until the time of auction.
Going, going, gone! Live auctions are always exciting and entertaining whether you're the bidder or not, and government auctions are no exception. Make sure you don't miss your cue to bid. If you're not clear on how bidding progresses, ask one of the auction company officials. Some items will have an undisclosed set minimum bid (reserve), while most items will be offered without reserve. Most auctions will also accept in-absence, written bids if the bidder follows special procedures and the bid is received more than a day before the auction.

Competitive bidders are not guaranteed to receive securities as bid approval depends on the discount yields that are submitted. A competitive tender is submitted by bigger investors, such as institutional investors. Each bidder is limited to 35% of the amount of the offering per bill auction. Each bid submitted specifies the lowest rate or discount margin that the investor is willing to accept for the debt securities. The bids with the lowest discount rate will be accepted first. The lowest discount rate which meets the supply of debt being sold serves as the “winning” yield or the highest accepted yield, after all non-competitive bids have been subtracted from the total amount of securities offered. All investors who bid at or above the level of the winning yield receives securities with this discount rate. All bidders, competitive and non-competitive, will receive this yield.
Internet auctions – With a potential audience of millions the Internet is the most exciting part of the auction world at the moment. Led by sites in the United States but closely followed by UK auction houses, specialist Internet auctions are springing up all over the place, selling everything from antiques and collectibles to holidays, air travel, brand new computers, and household equipment.
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Tuesday, March 19th at 12:07pm Bidding closes on the first item at 12:07 pm, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Monday, March 18th 9am to 11am REMOVAL:   [ View Full Listing ]

Do your research. Check Kelly Blue Book for the proper price for the vehicle, including its mileage and apparent condition. Always downgrade the condition by one ranking for government auctions. Also, do some smart used-car research, such as checking Consumer Reports for reliability and the frequencies of particular repairs, and checking our road test information if it's a recent model vehicle.
The word "auction" is derived from the Latin augeō, which means "I increase" or "I augment".[1] For most of history, auctions have been a relatively uncommon way to negotiate the exchange of goods and commodities. In practice, both haggling and sale by set-price have been significantly more common.[5] Indeed, before the seventeenth century the few auctions that were held were sporadic.[6]

This is the practice, especially by high-end art auctioneers,[64] of raising false bids at crucial times in the bidding in order to create the appearance of greater demand or to extend bidding momentum for a work on offer. To call out these nonexistent bids auctioneers might fix their gaze at a point in the auction room that is difficult for the audience to pin down.[65] The practice is frowned upon in the industry.[65] In the United States, chandelier bidding is not illegal. In fact, an auctioneer may bid up the price of an item to the reserve price, which is an unstated amount the consignor will not sell the item for. However, the auction house is required to disclose this information.
Combinatorial auction is any auction for the simultaneous sale of more than one item where bidders can place bids on an "all-or-nothing" basis on "packages" rather than just individual items. That is, a bidder can specify that he or she will pay for items A and B, but only if he or she gets both.[30] In combinatorial auctions, determining the winning bidder(s) can be a complex process where even the bidder with the highest individual bid is not guaranteed to win.[30] For example, in an auction with four items (W, X, Y and Z), if Bidder A offers $50 for items W & Y, Bidder B offers $30 for items W & X, Bidder C offers $5 for items X & Z and Bidder D offers $30 for items Y & Z, the winners will be Bidders B & D while Bidder A misses out because the combined bids of Bidders B & D is higher ($60) than for Bidders A and C ($55).
On-site auctions – Sometimes when the stock or assets of a company are simply too vast or too bulky for an auction house to transport to their own premises and store, they will hold an auction within the confines of the bankrupt company itself. Bidders could find themselves bidding for items which are still plugged in, and the great advantage of these auctions taking place on the premises is that they have the opportunity to view the goods as they were being used, and may be able to try them out. Bidders can also avoid the possibility of goods being damaged whilst they are being removed as they can do it or at least supervise the activity.
Private treaty sales – Occasionally, when looking at an auction catalogue some of the items have been withdrawn. Usually these goods have been sold by 'private treaty'. This means that the goods have already been sold off, usually to a trader or dealer on a private, behind-the-scenes basis before they have had a chance to be offered at the auction sale. These goods are rarely in single lots – photocopiers or fax machines would generally be sold in bulk lots.
... The two auctions differ in terms of payment: In the pay-as-bid auction, bidders pay their actual bids. In the uniform-price auction, bidders pay the market-clearing price for all units won. 2 This paper compares these two commonly 1 In the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which authorized spectrum auctions, the U.S. Congress established the " efficient and intensive use of the electromagnetic spectrum " as a primary objective of U.S spectrum auctions (47 U.S.C. § 309(j)(3)(D)). 2 The cross-country study on Treasury practices by Brenner,Galai and Sade (2009)reports that, out of the 48 countries surveyed, 24 use a pay-as-bid auction to finance public debt, 9 use a uniform-price auction, and 9 employ both auction formats, depending on the type of security being issued; the remaining 6 use a different mechanism. In the United States, the Treasury has been using the pay-as-bid auction to sell Treasury bills since 1929 and to issue notes and bonds since the 1970s. ...
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