All airport baggage personel and TSA staff at every airport are nothing but a theft ring. All of them profit from what they steal and no inquiries or investigations are ever actually conducted. The paperwork is just filed, with much laughter. Everything with real value, such as cameras, jewelry and electronics is smuggled out in the pockets of airport personnel on a daily basis. I doubt that these auctions have much to offer since it is the stuff that was deemed to worthless to steal by airport staff. They just busted a stewardess in Seattle who snagged a passenger's iPad. They tracked it to her home. Maybe we need a vigilante group putting tracking devices in our cameras, x-boxes, etc., so we can do the same? Makes you wonder why the cops don't use trackable "bait" items to shut down these vast theft rings. Over one million pieces of luggage were classified as "missing" and never located (ever)by the airlines last year. Think about that.
In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.

PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd 12:07 pm Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Friday, March 15th 9am to 2pm  INSPECT:   [ View Full Listing ]

There will usually be an estimate of what price the lot will fetch. In an ascending open auction it is considered important to get at least a 50-percent increase in the bids from start to finish. To accomplish this, the auctioneer must start the auction by announcing a suggested opening bid (SOB) that is low enough to be immediately accepted by one of the bidders. Once there is an opening bid, there will quickly be several other, higher bids submitted. Experienced auctioneers will often select an SOB that is about 45 percent of the (lowest) estimate. Thus there is a certain margin of safety to ensure that there will indeed be a lively auction with many bids submitted. Several observations indicate that the lower the SOB, the higher the final winning bid. This is due to the increase in the number of bidders attracted by the low SOB.
Consignee and consignor - as pertaining to auctions, the consignor (also called the seller, and in some contexts the vendor) is the person owning the item to be auctioned or the owner's representative,[65] while the consignee is the auction house. The consignor maintains title until such time that an item is purchased by a bidder and the bidder pays the auction house.

Reserve auction is an auction where the item for sale may not be sold if the final bid is not high enough to satisfy the seller; that is, the seller reserves the right to accept or reject the highest bid.[37] In these cases a set 'reserve' price known to the auctioneer, but not necessarily to the bidders, may have been set, below which the item may not be sold.[36] If the seller announces to the bidders the reserve price, it is a public reserve price auction.[39] In contrast, if the seller does not announce the reserve price before the sale but only after the sale, it is a secret reserve price auction.[40] The reserve price may be fixed or discretionary. In the latter case, the decision to accept a bid is deferred to the auctioneer, who may accept a bid that is marginally below it. A reserve auction is safer for the seller than a no-reserve auction as they are not required to accept a low bid, but this could result in a lower final price if less interest is generated in the sale.[37]


The District of Columbia now auctions its surplus property online through GovDeals, a Liquidity Services, Inc. marketplace. The district awarded the contract for the management of the inventory, appraisal, sale and shipping of the city's surplus property to Liquidity Services Inc. LSI conducts auctions of city assets such as vehicles, police automobile accessories, computer equipment, radios and other communications equipment, office furniture and other supplies through its online marketplace. The auctions are expected to improve data tracking and financial oversight of the city's surplus asset disposition activities.
The goods found at Police Auction can be brand new or graded from A down in used condition. Goods may be slightly marked a good example would be high quality push-bikes which still retain a good value. All items listed in any Police Auction are available for viewing and inspection prior to the sale. If faulty or damaged the fact is clearly mentioned on the item and faults will be outlined by the auctioneer during the auction. If this is an Online Police Auction the description should be clear and accurate. These auction events are a prime location for bargain hunters. Many of the goods will be sold for extremely low prices and almost always under market value. Remember, these goods are at auction TO BE SOLD, the police forces need to clear their stores regardless of how low the highest bid for the items at the Police Auction. 

Buying the confiscated goods either from the TSA or individual states is done in auctions 90% of the time. Some confiscated items are put up directly for sale though, and you can find it on the websites for direct purchase. The state surplus auctions are held regularly, and if you're planning to show up for it, it's definitely best to check if you have to register beforehand. Several states require this.
At times, customs may decide to not only seize goods but detain the passenger as well. This can happen for a number of different reasons. One reason is if, as mentioned above, a passenger has not declared the item(s) or if they have been declared falsely. Another reason would be if an individual carried with them over 200 grams of tobacco or a very large amount of alcohol.
DATE COUNTRY AUCTION DETAILS 7-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 7-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 8-Jan United States Sale of 3-year notes 8-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Jan Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 8-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 8-Jan Netherlands DSL Auction 9-Jan United States Sale of 10-year notes 9-Jan Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Jan Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 10-Jan United States Sale of 30-year bond 10-Jan Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 10-Jan Italy Bills auction 11-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 11-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 15-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 16-Jan Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 16-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 16-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 17-Jan Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 21-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 21-Jan Belgium OLO Auction 21-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 24-Jan Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 24-Jan Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 25-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Jan Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 28-Jan United States Sale of 2-year notes 28-Jan United States Sale of 5-year notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 7-year notes 29-Jan Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 29-Jan Italy Bills auction 30-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 30-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 30-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 31-Jan Japan 2-year discount bill auction 1-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 4-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 4-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 5-Feb United States Sale of 3-year notes 5-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 5-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 6-Feb United States Sale of 10-year notes 6-Feb Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 7-Feb United States Sale of 30-year bond 7-Feb Japan 6-month discount bill auction 7-Feb Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 7-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 8-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 12-Feb Italy Bills auction 12-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 13-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 13-Feb Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 13-Feb Sweden Auction of government bonds 13-Feb Norway Auction of Treasuries 15-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 15-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year Inflation-Indexed Bonds 18-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 18-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 19-Feb Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Feb Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Feb United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 21-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 22-Feb Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 22-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Feb United States Sale of 2-year notes 25-Feb United States Sale of 5-year notes 26-Feb United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Feb Italy Bills auction 27-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Feb Japan 2-year discount bill auction
Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
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