Bid NOW http://baileyshonor.com/auctions/2019/OL190321/details.htm Over 70 pieces of Roseville Pottery, 25 lots of vintage colored plastic table top radios and transistors, Over 35 lots of antique and vintage clocks (mantle and alarm), nice painted primitive cupboards and cabinets including corner cabinets and pie safe, Shaker and Deacon benches, Hoosier style kitchen cupboards, 60" HD 3D   [ View Full Listing ]
Pay and pickup. Generally, for transactions of $5000 or less, the full payment is due by the end of the day of sale, whereas for higher sale amounts a large-sum deposit might be required. Payment policies should have been outlined at the time of registration, but contact the auction company for more information. Most vehicles will be released on the day of sale, but in some cases a background check of the buyer will be required to be sure they are not the former owner buying the car back.
Heard the promises of $100 retired military Jeeps and $500 luxury cars confiscated in drug raids? You've likely seen the newspaper ads, flyers and infomercials that were so popular in recent years as part of get-rich-quick schemes, promising to show us how to buy luxury automobiles at a small fraction of their real worth through government auctions.
In an English auction, a dummy bid is a bid made by a dummy bidder acting in collusion with the auctioneer or vendor, designed to deceive genuine bidders into paying more. In a first-price auction, a dummy bid is an unfavourable bid designed so as not to become the winning bid. (The bidder does not want to win this auction, but he or she wants to make sure to be invited to the next auction).
Another approach to choosing an SOB: The auctioneer may achieve good success by asking the expected final sales price for the item, as this method suggests to the potential buyers the item's particular value. For instance, say an auctioneer is about to sell a $1,000 car at a sale. Instead of asking $100, hoping to entice wide interest (for who wouldn't want a $1,000 car for $100?), the auctioneer may suggest an opening bid of $1,000; although the first bidder may begin bidding at a mere $100, the final bid may more likely approach $1,000.
If for any reason, Auctioneer is unable to make available or deliver any purchase or clear title to the same, or documentation required in respect of any purchase, whether before or after delivery, Auctioneer’s sole liability shall be the return of monies paid in respect of such purchase upon its return by purchaser. Any such purchase shall be returned or surrendered upon demand by Auctioneer.

Internet auctions – With a potential audience of millions the Internet is the most exciting part of the auction world at the moment. Led by sites in the United States but closely followed by UK auction houses, specialist Internet auctions are springing up all over the place, selling everything from antiques and collectibles to holidays, air travel, brand new computers, and household equipment.
Removal of all items shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser. Loading assistance is provided as a courtesy; however, purchaser assumes all risk and responsibility for loading and removal of purchases. Auctioneer reserves the right to require proof of adequate insurance coverage from any purchaser items requiring dismantling, rigging or hot cutting. Purchaser agrees to indemnify and save harmless both, consignor and Auctioneer, its officers, directors, employees, agents, and attorneys against any damage caused by the acts of purchaser. All items must be removed from the auction facility within 2 days after the auction date. If for any reason purchaser fails to remove any purchase within the time specified, the purchase shall be deemed abandoned, and Auctioneer at its sole discretion may resell the items. Purchaser shall be liable for any rent incurred or damages suffered by Auctioneer because of purchaser’s failure to remove any item. Failure to remove items will result in a rental / storage fee of not less than $25 per item per day.
I wasn't aware that the TSA sold all of the stuff it confiscated! That's cheap goods right there! My mom works for a cruise line, and they don't confiscate stuff, but people do tend to forget all kinds of things they bring on the ship, so every once in a while the company has a big flea market available to employees. I find it funny when my mom comes home with watches and bracelets she wouldn't have otherwise bought.
... cdebt.treas.gov 2 Krishna (2002), among others, analyzes the uniform auction in which the uniform price is the highest losing bid, the multi-unit version of a second price auction. We analyze the uniform auction with the price set to the lowest winning bid because that is what Treasuries use; it is the multi-unit version of the first-price auction. Brenner et al (2009) surveyed 48 countries, of which 24 used the discriminatory format and 9 the uniform format. tion, which in turn is higher than the low bid in the uniform auction. For both auction formats, bidders shade their bids with respect to the expected value of the good, conditional on the signal observation, for all signals but the lowest. We ch ...
There should be “decent demand at the auction as Italy has struck a deal on the 2019 budget with the EU,” said Jens Peter Sorensen, chief analyst at Danske Bank. “Typically, the auction is a good indicator for the demand for Italian government bonds going into 2019. If there is strong demand at the auction, then Italy tends to perform well in January,” he said.
Some people believe that this program is damaging because it could cause long-term interest rates to rise further. That’s because there will be a greater supply of Treasurys on the market, and the U.S. Treasury will have to offer higher interest rates on the Treasurys it auctions to convince anyone to buy them. That will make the U.S. debt more expensive for the government to pay back.

The Romans also used auctions to liquidate the assets of debtors whose property had been confiscated.[8] For example, Marcus Aurelius sold household furniture to pay off debts, the sales lasting for months.[9] One of the most significant historical auctions occurred in the year 193 A.D. when the entire Roman Empire was put on the auction block by the Praetorian Guard. On 28 March 193, the Praetorian Guard first killed emperor Pertinax, then offered the empire to the highest bidder. Didius Julianus outbid everyone else for the price of 6,250 drachmas per guard,[citation needed] an act that initiated a brief civil war. Didius was then beheaded two months later when Septimius Severus conquered Rome.[8]
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
In an English auction, a dummy bid is a bid made by a dummy bidder acting in collusion with the auctioneer or vendor, designed to deceive genuine bidders into paying more. In a first-price auction, a dummy bid is an unfavourable bid designed so as not to become the winning bid. (The bidder does not want to win this auction, but he or she wants to make sure to be invited to the next auction).
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
Reserve auction is an auction where the item for sale may not be sold if the final bid is not high enough to satisfy the seller; that is, the seller reserves the right to accept or reject the highest bid.[37] In these cases a set 'reserve' price known to the auctioneer, but not necessarily to the bidders, may have been set, below which the item may not be sold.[36] If the seller announces to the bidders the reserve price, it is a public reserve price auction.[39] In contrast, if the seller does not announce the reserve price before the sale but only after the sale, it is a secret reserve price auction.[40] The reserve price may be fixed or discretionary. In the latter case, the decision to accept a bid is deferred to the auctioneer, who may accept a bid that is marginally below it. A reserve auction is safer for the seller than a no-reserve auction as they are not required to accept a low bid, but this could result in a lower final price if less interest is generated in the sale.[37]
Competitive bidders are not guaranteed to receive securities as bid approval depends on the discount yields that are submitted. A competitive tender is submitted by bigger investors, such as institutional investors. Each bidder is limited to 35% of the amount of the offering per bill auction. Each bid submitted specifies the lowest rate or discount margin that the investor is willing to accept for the debt securities. The bids with the lowest discount rate will be accepted first. The lowest discount rate which meets the supply of debt being sold serves as the “winning” yield or the highest accepted yield, after all non-competitive bids have been subtracted from the total amount of securities offered. All investors who bid at or above the level of the winning yield receives securities with this discount rate. All bidders, competitive and non-competitive, will receive this yield.
Participants in any Treasury auction consist of small investors and institutional investors who submit bids categorized as either competitive or non-competitive tenders. Non-competitive tenders are submitted by smaller investors who are guaranteed to receive bills, but they won’t know what discount rate they will receive until the auction closes. In effect, these investors receive no guarantee on the price or discount received. An investor who submits a non-competitive bid agrees to accept whatever discount rate is decided at the auction, determined by the competitive side of the auction which is handled as a Dutch auction. The minimum non-competitive tender for a Treasury bill is $10,000. The non-competitive closing time for bills is normally 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on auction day.
Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.
People were on their cellphones taking bids from afar, others were desperately eyeing the cars to see if the panels and bumper covers were in decent enough shape to make some cash at the current bidding price. Though there were only a handful of folks at this little auction, the dynamic—the subtle things people did to make sure they made a sound buying decision—was enthralling.
The word "auction" is derived from the Latin augeō, which means "I increase" or "I augment".[1] For most of history, auctions have been a relatively uncommon way to negotiate the exchange of goods and commodities. In practice, both haggling and sale by set-price have been significantly more common.[5] Indeed, before the seventeenth century the few auctions that were held were sporadic.[6]
At the close of an auction, Treasury awards all noncompetitive bids that comply with the auction rules and then accepts competitive bids in ascending order of their rate, yield, or discount margin (lowest to highest) until the quantity of awarded bids reaches the offering amount. All bidders will receive the same rate, yield, or discount margin at the highest accepted bid.

You can find out when Treasury securities will be auctioned by viewing the recent announcements of pending auctions. Once an auction is announced, your institution may submit a bid for the security. You may bid directly through TreasuryDirect (except for Cash Management Bills), TAAPS (with an established account), or you can make arrangements to purchase securities through a broker, dealer, or financial institution.
26-Mar Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 26-Mar Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 26-Mar Germany Auction of 2-year Treasury notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 27-Mar United States Sale of 5-year notes 27-Mar Italy Bills auction 27-Mar Sweden Auction of government bonds 27-Mar Norway Auction of Treasuries 27-Mar Germany Auction of 10-year Federal bonds 28-Mar United States Sale of 7-year notes 28-Mar Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Mar Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 1-Apr Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 2-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 3-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 3-Apr Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 3-Apr Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 4-Apr Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 5-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Apr Norway Auction of Treasury bills 8-Apr France Auction of BTF Treasury notes 9-Apr United States Sale of 3-year notes 9-Apr Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Apr Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 9-Apr Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 10-Apr United States Sale of 10-year notes 10-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 10-Apr Norway Auction of Treasuries 11-Apr United States Sale of 30-year bond 11-Apr Italy Bills auction 12-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 12-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 16-Apr Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 18-Apr Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Apr France Index-linked Securities auction 19-Apr Japan 3-month discount bill auction 23-Apr United States Sale of 2-year notes 23-Apr Japan Auction of 2-year government bonds 24-Apr United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 24-Apr United States Sale of 5-year notes 24-Apr Italy Zero Coupon/BTPi auction 24-Apr Sweden Auction of government bonds 25-Apr United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Apr Italy Bills auction 27-Apr Italy Medium-long term auction 29-Apr Belgium OLO Auction
Pursuant to the Dallas City Charter, all items that exceed $20,000 threshold requires the City of Dallas, City Council approval and will require the bidder to have a hold place on the item(s) purchased for approximately 6 to 8 weeks prior to delivery (Pending city councils approval). In addition, the City of Dallas reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
DATE COUNTRY AUCTION DETAILS 7-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 7-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 8-Jan United States Sale of 3-year notes 8-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Jan Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 8-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 8-Jan Netherlands DSL Auction 9-Jan United States Sale of 10-year notes 9-Jan Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Jan Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 10-Jan United States Sale of 30-year bond 10-Jan Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 10-Jan Italy Bills auction 11-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 11-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 15-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 16-Jan Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 16-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 16-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 17-Jan Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 21-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 21-Jan Belgium OLO Auction 21-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 24-Jan Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 24-Jan Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 25-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Jan Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 28-Jan United States Sale of 2-year notes 28-Jan United States Sale of 5-year notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 7-year notes 29-Jan Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 29-Jan Italy Bills auction 30-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 30-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 30-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 31-Jan Japan 2-year discount bill auction 1-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 4-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 4-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 5-Feb United States Sale of 3-year notes 5-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 5-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 6-Feb United States Sale of 10-year notes 6-Feb Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 7-Feb United States Sale of 30-year bond 7-Feb Japan 6-month discount bill auction 7-Feb Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 7-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 8-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 12-Feb Italy Bills auction 12-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 13-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 13-Feb Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 13-Feb Sweden Auction of government bonds 13-Feb Norway Auction of Treasuries 15-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 15-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year Inflation-Indexed Bonds 18-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 18-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 19-Feb Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Feb Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Feb United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 21-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 22-Feb Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 22-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Feb United States Sale of 2-year notes 25-Feb United States Sale of 5-year notes 26-Feb United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Feb Italy Bills auction 27-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Feb Japan 2-year discount bill auction
Silent auction is a variant of the English auction in which bids are written on a sheet of paper. At the predetermined end of the auction, the highest listed bidder wins the item.[43] This auction is often used in charity events, with many items auctioned simultaneously and "closed" at a common finish time.[43][44] The auction is "silent" in that there is no auctioneer selling individual items,[43] the bidders writing their bids on a bidding sheet often left on a table near the item.[45] At charity auctions, bid sheets usually have a fixed starting amount, predetermined bid increments, and a "guaranteed bid" amount which works the same as a "buy now" amount. Other variations of this type of auction may include sealed bids.[43] The highest bidder pays the price he or she submitted.[43]

Auctioneers are normally contracted by the different organisations within their local area. An auction at the centre of London for example, will deal with the assets of companies whose bankruptcy proceedings are being dealt with by courts in Greater London. An auction in Leeds will handle the assets of companies in Yorkshire that are being dealt with by Leeds City Court.
Pursuant to the Dallas City Charter, all items that exceed $20,000 threshold requires the City of Dallas, City Council approval and will require the bidder to have a hold place on the item(s) purchased for approximately 6 to 8 weeks prior to delivery (Pending city councils approval). In addition, the City of Dallas reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction mechanism.An important feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: Uniform vs.Discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding thepreference of one mechanism over the other. Experimental papers investigated the issueunder an exogenous equal number of bidders. We investigate the ... [Show full abstract]View full-text
Bidding fee auction, also known as a penny auction, often requires that each participant must pay a fixed price to place each bid, typically one penny (hence the name) higher than the current bid. When an auction's time expires, the highest bidder wins the item and must pay a final bid price.[27] Unlike in a conventional auction, the final price is typically much lower than the value of the item, but all bidders (not just the winner) will have paid for each bid placed; the winner will buy the item at a very low price (plus price of rights-to-bid used), all the losers will have paid, and the seller will typically receive significantly more than the value of the item.[28]
DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS OUTRAGEOUS AUCTION SALE!!!! NEW PERLICK DUAL TOWER BEER KEGERATOR, NEW PERLICK BAR BACK, NEW TRUE 2 DOOR COOLER, NEW TRUE ONE DOOR FREEZER, NEW ICE-O-MATIC ICE MACHINE, NEW GLAS TENDER BEER COOLER, PERLICK BEER COOLER, GLAS TENDER BAR BACK, NEW TRUE BEVERAGE MERCHANDISER, NEW TURBO AIR FREEZER MERCHANDISER, NEW FWE FOOD WARMING CABINET, SCOTSMAN ICE MACHINE, NEW ALTO SHAAM   [ View Full Listing ]
The Auction Catalog has been prepared as a guide, and should be used as a guide only. Although the descriptions are believed to be correct its accuracy cannot be guaranteed or warranted. The Bidder acknowledges that all auction items are available for inspection prior to the auction and it is the Bidders responsibility to have inspected the item before bidding. No sale shall be invalidated; nor shall auctioneers be liable as a result of defects or inaccuracies of any lot.

Treasury Bills Auctions are typically held every Tuesday and successful bids are settled on the following Thursday on a T+2 settlement cycle. When the auction date, or the settlement date, or any day in between the auction date and the settlement date falls on a non-business day, the auction takes place on the first business day of the same week and settled on a T+2 basis.


Local police auctions. If you are interested in local police impound car auctions the best way to find information is to call your local police department. They can provide with the dates and details. Under no circumstances should you call 911 for this information. Look in the local blue pages for the non-emergency number. They are also required to run ads in the local newspaper about 90 days prior to the auction. These are often low key ads in the classified section, so finding them may require some searching. Some police departments put auction information online, so you can also search the Internet
Whenever bidders at an auction are aware of the identity of the other bidders there is a risk that they will form a "ring" or "pool" and thus manipulate the auction result, a practice known as collusion. By agreeing to bid only against outsiders, never against members of the "ring", competition becomes weaker, which may dramatically affect the final price level. After the end of the official auction an unofficial auction may take place among the "ring" members. The difference in price between the two auctions could then be split among the members. This form of a ring was used as a central plot device in the opening episode of the 1979 British television series The House of Caradus, 'For Love or Money', uncovered by Helena Caradus on her return from Paris.
To finance the public debt, the U.S. Treasury sells bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to institutional and individual investors through public auctions. Treasury auctions occur regularly and have a set schedule. There are three steps to an auction: announcement of the auction, bidding, and issuance of the purchased securities.
Bid NOW http://baileyshonor.com/auctions/2019/OL190321/details.htm Over 70 pieces of Roseville Pottery, 25 lots of vintage colored plastic table top radios and transistors, Over 35 lots of antique and vintage clocks (mantle and alarm), nice painted primitive cupboards and cabinets including corner cabinets and pie safe, Shaker and Deacon benches, Hoosier style kitchen cupboards, 60" HD 3D   [ View Full Listing ]
Heard the promises of $100 retired military Jeeps and $500 luxury cars confiscated in drug raids? You've likely seen the newspaper ads, flyers and infomercials that were so popular in recent years as part of get-rich-quick schemes, promising to show us how to buy luxury automobiles at a small fraction of their real worth through government auctions. 

In some parts of England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries auction by candle began to be used for the sale of goods and leaseholds.[10] In a candle auction, the end of the auction was signaled by the expiration of a candle flame, which was intended to ensure that no one could know exactly when the auction would end and make a last-second bid. Sometimes, other unpredictable processes, such as a footrace, were used in place of the expiration of a candle. This type of auction was first mentioned in 1641 in the records of the House of Lords.[11] The practice rapidly became popular, and in 1660 Samuel Pepys's diary recorded two occasions when the Admiralty sold surplus ships "by an inch of candle". Pepys also relates a hint from a highly successful bidder, who had observed that, just before expiring, a candle-wick always flares up slightly: on seeing this, he would shout his final - and winning - bid. The London Gazette began reporting on the auctioning of artwork at the coffeehouses and taverns of London in the late 17th century.
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
Participants in any Treasury auction consist of small investors and institutional investors who submit bids categorized as either competitive or non-competitive tenders. Non-competitive tenders are submitted by smaller investors who are guaranteed to receive bills, but they won’t know what discount rate they will receive until the auction closes. In effect, these investors receive no guarantee on the price or discount received. An investor who submits a non-competitive bid agrees to accept whatever discount rate is decided at the auction, determined by the competitive side of the auction which is handled as a Dutch auction. The minimum non-competitive tender for a Treasury bill is $10,000. The non-competitive closing time for bills is normally 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on auction day. 

Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
Pursuant to the Dallas City Charter, all items that exceed $20,000 threshold requires the City of Dallas, City Council approval and will require the bidder to have a hold place on the item(s) purchased for approximately 6 to 8 weeks prior to delivery (Pending city councils approval). In addition, the City of Dallas reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

14-Mar Japan 3-month discount bill auction 18-Mar Norway Auction of Treasury bills 18-Mar Belgium OLO Auction 18-Mar Netherlands DTC Auction 19-Mar Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Mar Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Mar Germany Auction of 5-year Federal notes 20-Mar Portugal Auction of Treasury bills 21-Mar Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 21-Mar France Index-linked Securities auction 21-Mar Spain Bond Auction 22-Mar Japan 3-month discount bill auction 26-Mar United States Sale of 2-year notes
Real property - Primarily, this consists of developed land with buildings, usually acquired by the federal government for a specific purpose, such as a military base or office building. This also includes some U.S. Forest Service properties, which usually consist of administrative sites and facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) is the federal agency responsible for selling developed surplus property.   

To bid, you'll mostly need to go to an auction house on the day and bid in person. However, some auction houses now offer live internet or telephone bidding. You'll have to register to bid with the auction house, whether you're bidding in person or not. You should be able to find out when the next police auction will be held by visiting the auction house's website.
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. An important feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: uniform versus discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding the dominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferences of the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. We find that the majority of the issuers/countries in our sample use a discriminatory auction mechanism for issuing government debt. We use a multinomial logit procedure and discriminatory analysis to investigate the mechanism choice. It was interesting to find that market-oriented economies and those that practice common law tend to use a uniform method while economies who are less market oriented and practice civil law tend to use discriminatory price auctions.
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]

PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Tuesday, March 19th, beginning at 11:07 am Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Thursday, March 14th, 10 am - 2   [ View Full Listing ]
At Capital Auto Auction, we buy, sell and accept donations of used vehicles of various kinds. Whether it's for cars, boats or fleets of vehicles, we make it our goal to work out arrangements that satisfy both buyers and sellers. Our live auctions take place in four locations: Manchester, New Hampshire; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Temple Hills, Maryland; and Washington, DC. Our online auctions make it possible for you to bid on cars from your computer or smartphone. Also, in addition to hosting weekly auctions, we accept vehicles on consignments, doing all the advertising and networking to help you get a car sold. 
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