You can find some information online, on government websites which will let you search your area for a particular vehicle. These sites are not limited to cars, either. You can find SUVs, trucks and motorcycles on many of them too. Doing a ZIP code search and choosing a specific model will show you all the vehicles within a certain distance from you. Police specific auctions can be found by other websites like gov-auctions, which tells you when and where the local auctions will take place.

State Fleet Management will hold another Vehicle Auction on March 7, 2019 at the North Campus location, 1001 E. 62nd Avenue, Denver. The sealed-bid auctions are open to the public for accident, drivable, and non-drivable vehicles that need to be moved out of the fleet. Click here for sample sealed-bid sheet. On-site auctions are held approximately every 3-6 months depending on the amount of inventory, as well as selling other vehicles weekly on a year-round auction site, www.colo-auto-sales.com.
The bids with the lowest discount rates will be accepted first since the government will prefer to pay lower yields to investors. In this case, since the Treasury is looking to raise $9 million, it will accept the bids with the lowest rates up to 5.07%. At this mark, only $2 million of the $3 million bid will be approved. All bids above the 5.07% rate will be accepted, and bids below will be rejected. In effect, this auction is cleared at 5.07%, and all successful competitive and non-competitive bidders receive the 5.07% discount rate.
MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN: 303190). The registered office address of both MoneySupermarket.com Group PLC and MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited (registered in England No. 3157344) is MoneySupermarket House, St. David's Park, Ewloe, Chester, CH5 3UZ. MoneySavingExpert.com Limited is an appointed representative of MoneySupermarket.com Financial Group Limited. 

Earlier research has shown that euro-area primary public debt markets affect secondary markets. We find that more successful auctions of euro area public debt, as captured by higher bid-to-cover ratios, lead to lower secondary-market yields following the auctions. This effect is stronger when market volatility is higher. We rationalize both findings using a simple theoretical model of primary dealer behavior, in which the primary dealers receive a signal about the value of the asset auctioned.
CWS Asset Management and Sales (CWSAMS) is a nationwide company with expertise in the management, marketing and sales of a wide range of assets, specializing in web-based and live auctions. CWSAMS has provided continuous support to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, its legacy agencies, and other public & private entities for the marketing and sale of real and personal property for the past 26 years. An abbreviated list of clients are:
Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house
American Range restaurant range Two-door refrigerated sandwich prep table Cornelius Coldshot countertop machine J&J Snack Foods Corp pretzel warmer displays Commercial coffee makers Hatco glo-ray shelving merchandiser Henny Penny commercial breading machine Henny Penny gas pressure fryer US Range salamander broiler Beverage Air three-door refrigerated sandwich prep table Imperial Range   [ View Full Listing ]
One way the federal government finances its activities is by the sale of marketable Treasury bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to the public. Marketable securities can be bought, sold or transferred after they are originally issued. Treasury uses an auction process to sell marketable securities and determine their rate, yield, or discount margin. The value of Treasury marketable securities fluctuates with changes in interest rates and market demand. You can participate in an auction and purchase bills, notes, bonds, FRNs, and TIPS directly from the Treasury or you can purchase them through a bank or broker. Marketable securities held in your account can be sold at current market prices through brokers and many financial institutions.
Participants in any Treasury auction consist of small investors and institutional investors who submit bids categorized as either competitive or non-competitive tenders. Non-competitive tenders are submitted by smaller investors who are guaranteed to receive bills, but they won’t know what discount rate they will receive until the auction closes. In effect, these investors receive no guarantee on the price or discount received. An investor who submits a non-competitive bid agrees to accept whatever discount rate is decided at the auction, determined by the competitive side of the auction which is handled as a Dutch auction. The minimum non-competitive tender for a Treasury bill is $10,000. The non-competitive closing time for bills is normally 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on auction day.
Senior auction is a variation on the all-pay auction, and has a defined loser in addition to the winner. The top two bidders must pay their full final bid amounts, and only the highest wins the auction. The intent is to make the high bidders bid above their upper limits. In the final rounds of bidding, when the current losing party has hit their maximum bid, they are encouraged to bid over their maximum (seen as a small loss) to avoid losing their maximum bid with no return (a very large loss).
To bid, you'll mostly need to go to an auction house on the day and bid in person. However, some auction houses now offer live internet or telephone bidding. You'll have to register to bid with the auction house, whether you're bidding in person or not. You should be able to find out when the next police auction will be held by visiting the auction house's website.
DATE COUNTRY AUCTION DETAILS 19-Mar Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Mar Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Mar Germany Auction of 5-year Federal notes 20-Mar Portugal Auction of Treasury bills 21-Mar Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 21-Mar France Index-linked Securities auction 21-Mar Spain Bond Auction 22-Mar Japan 3-month discount bill auction 26-Mar United States Sale of 2-year notes

All airport baggage personel and TSA staff at every airport are nothing but a theft ring. All of them profit from what they steal and no inquiries or investigations are ever actually conducted. The paperwork is just filed, with much laughter. Everything with real value, such as cameras, jewelry and electronics is smuggled out in the pockets of airport personnel on a daily basis. I doubt that these auctions have much to offer since it is the stuff that was deemed to worthless to steal by airport staff. They just busted a stewardess in Seattle who snagged a passenger's iPad. They tracked it to her home. Maybe we need a vigilante group putting tracking devices in our cameras, x-boxes, etc., so we can do the same? Makes you wonder why the cops don't use trackable "bait" items to shut down these vast theft rings. Over one million pieces of luggage were classified as "missing" and never located (ever)by the airlines last year. Think about that.
Real property - Primarily, this consists of developed land with buildings, usually acquired by the federal government for a specific purpose, such as a military base or office building. This also includes some U.S. Forest Service properties, which usually consist of administrative sites and facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) is the federal agency responsible for selling developed surplus property.   

These programs are meant to benefit taxpayers as a whole, but could they benefit you, the individual taxpayer? Can you bag a bargain at a government auction? "GSA's goal is to maximize return to the federal government," the GSA spokesperson said. So they're not giving this stuff away. In fact, the government sets "reserves" or minimums for the most valuable property it auctions off. But judging from a wide tour of current government auctions and bids, there are still opportunities to walk away with valuable goods for a great price. Here's a look at who's selling what, where, and for how much.

The primary dealers form a worldwide network that distributes new U.S. government debt. For example, Daiwa Securities and Mizuho Securities distribute the debt to Japanese buyers. BNP Paribas, Barclays, Deutsche Bank, and RBS Greenwich Capital (a division of the Royal Bank of Scotland) distribute the debt to European buyers. Goldman Sachs, and Citigroup account for many American buyers. Nevertheless, most of these firms compete internationally and in all major financial centers.
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd 12:07 pm Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: Friday, March 15th 9am to 2pm  INSPECT:   [ View Full Listing ]
Police Auctions are a time-proven and established route used by Police forces across the country to dispose of proceeds of crime, lost and found, seized, unclaimed stolen and confiscated property. Police sales are held on a regular basis at auction houses and venues all over the UK. Our comprehensive Police Auction database covers ALL sales going on right now and details hundreds of auction lots every, single day. GAUK Police Auctions section shares with you ‘insider’ information on all the events!
All items are sold “AS IS-WHERE IS” without any guarantees or warranty expressed or implied, statutory or otherwise of any nature whatsoever in respect of the lots offered at the auction. Specifically, but without limitation, Auctioneer makes no representation or warranty that any of the lots conform to any standard in respect of safety, pollution or hazardous material, or fit for any particular purpose. The Auctioneers, sellers, or any member of their staff make no guarantee as to the authenticity, of any particular age, year of manufacture, model, make, mileage, hours, condition, or defect of any lot or item being sold. Bidders are encouraged to make their own physical inspection and rely solely on that inspection before bidding. Failure to inspect does not negate that Bidders responsibility to perform under the auction terms and conditions.
Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it.  

There are a number of primary website used by police to sell seized or lost and found items. bumblebeeauctions.co.uk acts effectively as a shop front the police force and local authorities which can use to dispose of various types of property. It is an official police website used by various forces across the country. Users bid on items in the same way as they would on sites such as eBay.co.uk.
Bidder acknowledges that an auction site is a potentially dangerous place. Flammable, noxious, corrosive and pressurized substances are present, heavy equipment is being operated and electric circuits may be live. Every person at the auction site, at any time, shall be there at his own risk without notice of the condition of the premises and the activities thereon and bidder shall so advise his agents and employees. No person shall have any claim against Auctioneer, its officers, directors, agents, employees, principals, or attorneys for any injuries sustained, nor for damages to or loss of property, which may occur from any cause whatsoever.
We are a premier full-service private auction company liquidating property seized by police and federal agencies, property from abandoned safe deposit boxes, seized bank assets, bankruptcies, financial institutions, business inventory liquidations, and other consignors. Our firm conducts traditional live auctions throughout the year at various locations across the country, as well as auctions on the Internet. Please see our schedule of upcoming auctions for further details. 

Bids can be made online for Internet auctions, or in person for live auctions. Accepted forms of payment typically are major credit cards and checks, and payment is due at the time of the close of the auction. Details may vary among auction houses and the state the auction is held in. As with all auctions, the vehicle is sold to the highest bidder.
PLEASE READ THESE TERMS OF SALE CAREFULLY, AS THEY HAVE BEEN RECENTLY UPDATED.  THIS IS AN INTERNET-ONLY AUCTION!  AUCTION CLOSING DATE: Friday, March 22nd, beginning at 11:07 am.  Bidding closes on the first item at 11:07 am, then closes at the rate discussed in these Terms and Conditions of Sale.  INSPECT: There is no inspection for   [ View Full Listing ]
DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS OUTRAGEOUS AUCTION SALE!!!! NEW PERLICK DUAL TOWER BEER KEGERATOR, NEW PERLICK BAR BACK, NEW TRUE 2 DOOR COOLER, NEW TRUE ONE DOOR FREEZER, NEW ICE-O-MATIC ICE MACHINE, NEW GLAS TENDER BEER COOLER, PERLICK BEER COOLER, GLAS TENDER BAR BACK, NEW TRUE BEVERAGE MERCHANDISER, NEW TURBO AIR FREEZER MERCHANDISER, NEW FWE FOOD WARMING CABINET, SCOTSMAN ICE MACHINE, NEW ALTO SHAAM   [ View Full Listing ] 

Earlier research has shown that euro-area primary public debt markets affect secondary markets. We find that more successful auctions of euro area public debt, as captured by higher bid-to-cover ratios, lead to lower secondary-market yields following the auctions. This effect is stronger when market volatility is higher. We rationalize both findings using a simple theoretical model of primary dealer behavior, in which the primary dealers receive a signal about the value of the asset auctioned.
You can find out when Treasury securities will be auctioned by viewing the recent announcements of pending auctions. Once an auction is announced, your institution may submit a bid for the security. You may bid directly through TreasuryDirect (except for Cash Management Bills), TAAPS (with an established account), or you can make arrangements to purchase securities through a broker, dealer, or financial institution.
Due to the various governmental units that supply the vehicles for auction, there's no single reason for vehicles being brought to auction. Some of the vehicles are confiscated due to the former owner's involvement in drug dealing, smuggling, or fraud, while other vehicles were simply just abandoned. On exception, separate auctions will sometimes be held for very large seizures. 

An auction is a process of buying and selling goods or services by offering them up for bid, taking bids, and then selling the item to the highest bidder. The open ascending price auction is arguably the most common form of auction in use today.[1] Participants bid openly against one another, with each subsequent bid required to be higher than the previous bid.[2] An auctioneer may announce prices, bidders may call out their bids themselves (or have a proxy call out a bid on their behalf), or bids may be submitted electronically with the highest current bid publicly displayed.[2] In a Dutch auction, the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] While auctions are most associated in the public imagination with the sale of antiques, paintings, rare collectibles and expensive wines, auctions are also used for commodities, livestock, radio spectrum and used cars. In economic theory, an auction may refer to any mechanism or set of trading rules for exchange.
Reverse auction is a type of auction in which the roles of the buyer and the seller are reversed, with the primary objective to drive purchase prices downward.[41] While ordinary auctions provide suppliers the opportunity to find the best price among interested buyers, reverse auctions give buyers a chance to find the lowest-price supplier. During a reverse auction, suppliers may submit multiple offers, usually as a response to competing suppliers’ offers, bidding down the price of a good or service to the lowest price they are willing to receive. By revealing the competing bids in real time to every participating supplier, reverse auctions promote “information transparency”. This, coupled with the dynamic bidding process, improves the chances of reaching the fair market value of the item.[42]
The process begins several days before the scheduled auction when the Treasury announces the details of the upcoming issue, including the amount to be auctioned and the maturity date. When you participate in an auction, you have two bidding options – competitive and noncompetitive. TreasuryDirect allows noncompetitive bidding only. Noncompetitive bidding is limited to purchases of $5 million per auction. Bidding limits apply cumulatively to all methods (TreasuryDirect, banks, and brokers) that are used for bidding in a single auction.
Treasury bills are routinely issued at weekly tenders, held by the DMO on the last business day of each week (i.e. usually on Fridays), for settlement on the following business day. Treasury bills are typically issued at tenders with maturities of 1 month (approximately 28 days), 3 months (approximately 91 days), or 6 months (approximately 182 days).

To bid, you'll mostly need to go to an auction house on the day and bid in person. However, some auction houses now offer live internet or telephone bidding. You'll have to register to bid with the auction house, whether you're bidding in person or not. You should be able to find out when the next police auction will be held by visiting the auction house's website.
If for any reason, Auctioneer is unable to make available or deliver any purchase or clear title to the same, or documentation required in respect of any purchase, whether before or after delivery, Auctioneer’s sole liability shall be the return of monies paid in respect of such purchase upon its return by purchaser. Any such purchase shall be returned or surrendered upon demand by Auctioneer.
2. Know what car you're looking for You can find a list of what’s for sale online, either at Govsales.gov (if it’s a federal police auction) or through your local agency/county/department (just Google it). You need to have a decent idea of what you’re wanting to pick up, or you won’t have time to properly vet everything, which could get messy. See above.
Many police forces across the UK sell on loot which they've seized. And because this isn't widely known about – and because the police sell on items they'd otherwise have to store or dispose of – you could bag real bargains. For example, we spotted a kids' bike for 99p (collection only), a classical guitar for £14 (incl delivery) and an Armani watch for £15 (collection only).
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