The following link will take you to the sale list for the next abandoned & confiscated vehicle auction. Be advised that some of these vehicles will not be present on the day of sale, as owners/lien holders will have reclaimed the vehicles. You must be present at the sale preview to know what remaining vehicles will be offered and to view vehicle conditions.
From our early days as an online police auction site, there was one piece of property & evidence that we did not touch – firearms. However, recently for many states and jurisdictions it has become a requirement, and even mandated, for law enforcement agencies to auction off their seized, forfeited and unclaimed firearms just as they do with other parts of the property and evidence room.
People were on their cellphones taking bids from afar, others were desperately eyeing the cars to see if the panels and bumper covers were in decent enough shape to make some cash at the current bidding price. Though there were only a handful of folks at this little auction, the dynamic—the subtle things people did to make sure they made a sound buying decision—was enthralling.
Police Auctions are a time-proven and established route used by Police forces across the country to dispose of proceeds of crime, lost and found, seized, unclaimed stolen and confiscated property. Police sales are held on a regular basis at auction houses and venues all over the UK. Our comprehensive Police Auction database covers ALL sales going on right now and details hundreds of auction lots every, single day. GAUK Police Auctions section shares with you ‘insider’ information on all the events!
At the close of an auction, Treasury awards all noncompetitive bids that comply with the auction rules and then accepts competitive bids in ascending order of their rate, yield, or discount margin (lowest to highest) until the quantity of awarded bids reaches the offering amount. All bidders will receive the same rate, yield, or discount margin at the highest accepted bid.
Age and nationality requirements. A bidding individual must be at least 18 years old to participate in government car sales. Unlike private auctions, which sometimes require a license to bid, a government car auction is generally open to the public. No special license is needed. However, in order to transact business with the federal government, a social security number or tax identification number is needed. If purchasing the vehicle for a company, then a Power of Attorney certificate is required
Bidder acknowledges that an auction site is a potentially dangerous place. Flammable, noxious, corrosive and pressurized substances are present, heavy equipment is being operated and electric circuits may be live. Every person at the auction site, at any time, shall be there at his own risk without notice of the condition of the premises and the activities thereon and bidder shall so advise his agents and employees. No person shall have any claim against Auctioneer, its officers, directors, agents, employees, principals, or attorneys for any injuries sustained, nor for damages to or loss of property, which may occur from any cause whatsoever.
The 18 City of Los Angeles Official Police Garages (OPGs) hold Lien Sales Auctions. The auctions are open to the public. All vehicles are sold "AS IS, WHERE IS" and with all faults. Seller makes no warranty or refunds. Vehicles are sold in an open competitive bid auction. The highest bidder is the buyer. The auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid or stop the sale of a vehicle. In the event of a dispute, the auctioneer's decision will be final.
Reserve auction is an auction where the item for sale may not be sold if the final bid is not high enough to satisfy the seller; that is, the seller reserves the right to accept or reject the highest bid.[37] In these cases a set 'reserve' price known to the auctioneer, but not necessarily to the bidders, may have been set, below which the item may not be sold.[36] If the seller announces to the bidders the reserve price, it is a public reserve price auction.[39] In contrast, if the seller does not announce the reserve price before the sale but only after the sale, it is a secret reserve price auction.[40] The reserve price may be fixed or discretionary. In the latter case, the decision to accept a bid is deferred to the auctioneer, who may accept a bid that is marginally below it. A reserve auction is safer for the seller than a no-reserve auction as they are not required to accept a low bid, but this could result in a lower final price if less interest is generated in the sale.[37]
At the close of an auction, Treasury accepts all noncompetitive bids that comply with the auction rules, and then accepts competitive bids in ascending order in terms of their rates, yields, or discount margins (lowest to highest) until the quantity of accepted bids reaches the offering amount. All bidders, noncompetitive and competitive, will receive the same rate, yield, or spread as the highest accepted bid.
As you browse the government auction sites above, you'll notice some link you to additional sites run by private contractors. These contractors have legitimate relationships with the government, but bidder beware: other private companies will try to make their auctions seem like government auctions as a marketing ploy. Always start with the legitimate links provided by the government itself. Good luck!
If for any reason, Auctioneer is unable to make available or deliver any purchase or clear title to the same, or documentation required in respect of any purchase, whether before or after delivery, Auctioneer’s sole liability shall be the return of monies paid in respect of such purchase upon its return by purchaser. Any such purchase shall be returned or surrendered upon demand by Auctioneer.
Any dispute arising as to any bidding shall be settled by Auctioneer at his sole discretion, and Auctioneer may put the lot in dispute up for sale again. Auctioneer reserves the right to refuse any bid, which it considers to be an insignificant advance over the preceding bid. No person shall bid on any lot of which he is the Consignor, agent, associate, or on behalf of the Consignor.
Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house
An announcement is released several days before the bill auction to kickstart the process. The announcement includes information such as the auction date, issue date, amount of security that will be sold, bidding close times, participation eligibility, etc. All auctions are open to the public through Treasury Direct or the Treasury Automated Auction Processing System (TAAPS).
All items are sold “AS IS-WHERE IS” without any guarantees or warranty expressed or implied, statutory or otherwise of any nature whatsoever in respect of the lots offered at the auction. Specifically, but without limitation, Auctioneer makes no representation or warranty that any of the lots conform to any standard in respect of safety, pollution or hazardous material, or fit for any particular purpose. The Auctioneers, sellers, or any member of their staff make no guarantee as to the authenticity, of any particular age, year of manufacture, model, make, mileage, hours, condition, or defect of any lot or item being sold. Bidders are encouraged to make their own physical inspection and rely solely on that inspection before bidding. Failure to inspect does not negate that Bidders responsibility to perform under the auction terms and conditions.
Once a car has served its time, it’s stripped of all its Police markings, siren, radio, gun box and serviced, before going under the hammer. These vehicles may have done more miles than your average family runabout but, Police Cars are kept in tip-top condition. No expense is spared in keeping these motors immaculate and they receive the best parts, tyres, even oil.
Bidding. Get some information about the type of bidding that normally occurs at these auctions. Feel free to ask the consultant about the expected price of a particular vehicle. When the auction starts, raise your hand and registration number card high in the air so the auctioneer can see you. Bids can be in increments of $100, $250 or even $500. This will be up to the auctioneer's discretion. Before bidding, remember that once a bid is made it cannot be withdrawn. Once the bid is won then the bid cards must be immediately filled out and signed. If this is not done then the vehicle can be re-offered. The government can reject any bid 

Bid NOW http://baileyshonor.com/auctions/2019/OL190321/details.htm Over 70 pieces of Roseville Pottery, 25 lots of vintage colored plastic table top radios and transistors, Over 35 lots of antique and vintage clocks (mantle and alarm), nice painted primitive cupboards and cabinets including corner cabinets and pie safe, Shaker and Deacon benches, Hoosier style kitchen cupboards, 60" HD 3D   [ View Full Listing ]
In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.

A primary dealer is a firm that buys government securities directly from a government, with the intention of reselling them to others, thus acting as a market maker of government securities. The government may regulate the behavior and number of its primary dealers and impose conditions of entry. Some governments sell their securities only to primary dealers; some sell them to others as well. Governments that use primary dealers include Belgium, Brazil,[1] Canada, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Singapore, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
I wasn't aware that the TSA sold all of the stuff it confiscated! That's cheap goods right there! My mom works for a cruise line, and they don't confiscate stuff, but people do tend to forget all kinds of things they bring on the ship, so every once in a while the company has a big flea market available to employees. I find it funny when my mom comes home with watches and bracelets she wouldn't have otherwise bought.
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