... Back and Zender (1993) andWang and Zender (2002)illustrate the nature of these equilibria and discuss the difficulties associated with drawing sharp comparisons across the pricing rules. 1 Empirically, there are limited and conflicting results concerning the relative attractiveness of the different auction formats (compare Simon (1992) to Umlauf (1993) andTenorio (1993)). In practice, even in the relatively simple realm of government debt auctions, different countries use different types of auctions (seeBrenner, Galai, and Sade (2009)). The importance of effective governmental borrowing in the remedies to the world financial crisis serves as a reminder of the importance of developing our understanding of this important market mechanism. ...
U.S. Marshal's Service Auctions : And finally, the U.S. Marshal's service auctions off some true bling as part of its mission to "combat major criminal activity by disrupting and dismantling illegal enterprises" and "depriving criminals of the proceeds of illegal activity." Once again, there is real estate, but also businesses, cash cars, collectibles — and more.
Due to the various governmental units that supply the vehicles for auction, there's no single reason for vehicles being brought to auction. Some of the vehicles are confiscated due to the former owner's involvement in drug dealing, smuggling, or fraud, while other vehicles were simply just abandoned. On exception, separate auctions will sometimes be held for very large seizures.
For more information regarding a specific county’s public auction sale, please view the county tax collector's website for the most accurate and up to date information, or contact the county tax collector's office directly.  Below is a link to each county's treasurer and tax collector website which contains county services and contact information.  Additionally, some counties may also list their sales at "bid4assets."

The word "auction" is derived from the Latin augeō, which means "I increase" or "I augment".[1] For most of history, auctions have been a relatively uncommon way to negotiate the exchange of goods and commodities. In practice, both haggling and sale by set-price have been significantly more common.[5] Indeed, before the seventeenth century the few auctions that were held were sporadic.[6]
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Sealed first-price auction or blind auction,[20] also known as a first-price sealed-bid auction (FPSB). In this type of auction all bidders simultaneously submit sealed bids so that no bidder knows the bid of any other participant. The highest bidder pays the price they submitted.[1][2] This type of auction is distinct from the English auction, in that bidders can only submit one bid each. Furthermore, as bidders cannot see the bids of other participants they cannot adjust their own bids accordingly.[2] From the theoretical perspective, this kind of bid process has been argued to be strategically equivalent to the Dutch auction.[21] However, empirical evidence from laboratory experiments has shown that Dutch auctions with high clock speeds yield lower prices than FPSB auctions.[22][23] What are effectively sealed first-price auctions are commonly called tendering for procurement by companies and organisations, particularly for government contracts and auctions for mining leases.[2]
Federal government auctions. Federal government car sales were once handled by the agency that had the vehicles to auction. For example, the DEA auctioned off both fleet vehicles and cars that were been seized from drug dealers and other criminals. Fleet vehicles are the cars that DEA agents drive as company vehicles. There are numerous agencies that auction vehicles. Recently these vehicles and auctions have been consolidated under a single website. GovSales consolidates numerous government auctions under one roof. It is easy to search by product type as well as type of vehicle. It shows what state the vehicle is located in as well as any available information. Photos are sometimes available, but not always. It often provides links to other sites that have additional information 

It is important to have realistic expectations when attending a government car auction. While you can find some good bargains, you are not going to find a brand new BMW for $100.00. Government auctions sell both fleet cars and vehicles that have been impounded by government agencies. The conditions of these vehicles can range from great to not running. Set your expectations and budget realistically.
This site advertises auctions of seized Real Property for sale throughout the United States and Puerto Rico and includes single and multi-family residences; commercial and residential land; commercial buildings and warehouses; and operating businesses. These properties have been seized and forfeited due to violations of federal laws enforced by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Participating enforcement agencies include: IRS-Criminal Investigations Division, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the U.S. Secret Service. All proceeds from the sale of property are deposited in the U.S. Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund. This fund helps support continued law enforcement efforts and provide restitution to crime victims.
By the end of the 18th century, auctions of art works were commonly held in taverns and coffeehouses. These auctions were held daily, and auction catalogs were printed to announce available items. In some cases these catalogs were elaborate works of art themselves, containing considerable detail about the items being auctioned. At this time, Christie's established a reputation as a leading auction house, taking advantage of London's status as the major centre of the international art trade after the French Revolution.
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No-reserve auction (NR), also known as an absolute auction, is an auction in which the item for sale will be sold regardless of price.[36][37] From the seller's perspective, advertising an auction as having no reserve price can be desirable because it potentially attracts a greater number of bidders due to the possibility of a bargain.[36] If more bidders attend the auction, a higher price might ultimately be achieved because of heightened competition from bidders.[37] This contrasts with a reserve auction, where the item for sale may not be sold if the final bid is not high enough to satisfy the seller. In practice, an auction advertised as "absolute" or "no-reserve" may nonetheless still not sell to the highest bidder on the day, for example, if the seller withdraws the item from the auction or extends the auction period indefinitely,[38] although these practices may be restricted by law in some jurisdictions or under the terms of sale available from the auctioneer. 

The relationship between the Fed and the primary dealers is governed by the Primary Dealers Act of 1988 and the Fed's operating policy "Administration of Relationships with Primary Dealers."[6] Primary dealers purchase the vast majority of the U.S. Treasury securities (T-bills, T-notes, and T-bonds) sold at auction, and resell them to the public. Their activities extend well beyond the Treasury market. For example, according to the Wall Street Journal Europe (2/9/06 p. 20), all of the top ten dealers in the foreign exchange market are also primary dealers, and between them account for almost 73% of foreign exchange trading volume. Arguably, this group's members are the most influential and powerful non-governmental institutions in global financial markets. Group membership changes slowly, with the current list available from the New York Fed.[2]
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One way the federal government finances its activities is by the sale of marketable Treasury bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes (FRNs), and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) to the public. Marketable securities can be bought, sold or transferred after they are originally issued. Treasury uses an auction process to sell marketable securities and determine their rate, yield, or discount margin. The value of Treasury marketable securities fluctuates with changes in interest rates and market demand. You can participate in an auction and purchase bills, notes, bonds, FRNs, and TIPS directly from the Treasury or you can purchase them through a bank or broker. Marketable securities held in your account can be sold at current market prices through brokers and many financial institutions.
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