Treasury bills (T-bills) are short-term debt securities issued by the U.S. government through the Treasury Department to help finance the national debt. These debt instruments mature within a year and are issued at a discount to par value. The maturity term for T-bills are: 1 month (or 4 weeks), 3 months (or 13 weeks), 6 months (or 26 weeks), and 1 year (or 52 weeks). The minimum amount you can buy a bill for is $100, although the most commonly sold bills have a par between $1,000 and $10,000. The bills are considered risk-free securities since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government and, hence, the yield on these securities is used as the benchmark for short-term interest rates. Treasury bills are issued in electronic form through an auction bidding process which is conducted every week.
Payment methods. A government auction accepts many modes of payment from credit cards or bank checks to cash. It is recommended to ask the auctioneer about the modes of payment involved before the auction starts. Besides the bidding price of the car, an additional buyer's premium fee is added onto the total. This fee is normally 5 percent of the winning bid
A listing of vehicles up for auction will be posted on this website as soon as it becomes available. Flyers containing a vehicle listing for this auction will be available at the Impound Section as soon as we can produce them. Some vehicles may not be listed on the internet, only on the flyer. Please do not call the Impound Section for vehicle information.
The objective of this paper is to investigate the preferences ofpotential bidders in choosing between uniform and discriminatory auctionpricing methods. Many financial assets, particularly government bonds,are issued in an auction. Uniform and discriminatory pricing constitutethe two most popular mechanisms used in public auctions. Theoreticalpapers have not been able to provide an unequivocal ... [Show full abstract]Read more
... The two auctions differ in terms of payment: In the pay-as-bid auction, bidders pay their actual bids. In the uniform-price auction, bidders pay the market-clearing price for all units won. 2 This paper compares these two commonly 1 In the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which authorized spectrum auctions, the U.S. Congress established the " efficient and intensive use of the electromagnetic spectrum " as a primary objective of U.S spectrum auctions (47 U.S.C. § 309(j)(3)(D)). 2 The cross-country study on Treasury practices by Brenner,Galai and Sade (2009)reports that, out of the 48 countries surveyed, 24 use a pay-as-bid auction to finance public debt, 9 use a uniform-price auction, and 9 employ both auction formats, depending on the type of security being issued; the remaining 6 use a different mechanism. In the United States, the Treasury has been using the pay-as-bid auction to sell Treasury bills since 1929 and to issue notes and bonds since the 1970s. ... 

DATE COUNTRY AUCTION DETAILS 7-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 7-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 8-Jan United States Sale of 3-year notes 8-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 8-Jan Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 8-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 8-Jan Netherlands DSL Auction 9-Jan United States Sale of 10-year notes 9-Jan Japan 6-month discount bill auction 9-Jan Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 10-Jan United States Sale of 30-year bond 10-Jan Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 10-Jan Italy Bills auction 11-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 11-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 15-Jan Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 16-Jan Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 16-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 16-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 17-Jan Japan 1-year discount bill auction 18-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 21-Jan Norway Auction of Treasury bills 21-Jan Belgium OLO Auction 21-Jan Netherlands DTC Auction 24-Jan Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 24-Jan Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 25-Jan Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Jan Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 28-Jan United States Sale of 2-year notes 28-Jan United States Sale of 5-year notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 29-Jan United States Sale of 7-year notes 29-Jan Japan Auction of 40-year government bonds 29-Jan Italy Bills auction 30-Jan Sweden Auction of government bonds 30-Jan Italy Medium-long term auction 30-Jan Norway Auction of Treasuries 31-Jan Japan 2-year discount bill auction 1-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 4-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 4-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 5-Feb United States Sale of 3-year notes 5-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year government bonds 5-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 6-Feb United States Sale of 10-year notes 6-Feb Sweden Auction of Treasury bills 7-Feb United States Sale of 30-year bond 7-Feb Japan 6-month discount bill auction 7-Feb Japan Auction of 30-year government bonds 7-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 8-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 12-Feb Italy Bills auction 12-Feb Belgium Auction of Treasury bills 13-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 13-Feb Japan Auction of 5-year government bonds 13-Feb Sweden Auction of government bonds 13-Feb Norway Auction of Treasuries 15-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 15-Feb Japan Auction of 10-year Inflation-Indexed Bonds 18-Feb Norway Auction of Treasury bills 18-Feb Netherlands DTC Auction 19-Feb Japan 1-year discount bill auction 19-Feb Japan Auction of 20-year government bonds 20-Feb United States Sale of 2-year floating rate notes 21-Feb Sweden Auction of inflation-linked government bonds 22-Feb Italy CTZ/BTPi auction 22-Feb Japan 3-month discount bill auction 25-Feb United States Sale of 2-year notes 25-Feb United States Sale of 5-year notes 26-Feb United States Sale of 7-year notes 26-Feb Italy Bills auction 27-Feb Italy Medium-long term auction 28-Feb Japan 2-year discount bill auction
When you’re in need of a reasonably priced used car, your best and easiest solution is to come to one of our used car auction events — either in person or online. Because our inventory is always being updated, there are lots of options available. Plus, because our prices are so good, you can save a great deal. At our auctions, we sell hundreds of cars for less than $1000 and are always open to the public — the bargains are just waiting for you.
PCI Auctions is now accepting quality consignments of new or used restaurant, bar, kitchen, bakery, commercial, industrial & heavy equipment for our Consignment Sale. No liquidation is too big for us! Contact us today to find out how we can get your top dollar for your equipment. Call 888-883-1388 for a free appraisal. Auction:John's Pizzeria & Catering Restaurant Equipment Enter   [ View Full Listing ]
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1]
Dutch auction also known as an open descending price auction.[1] In the traditional Dutch auction the auctioneer begins with a high asking price for some quantity of like items; the price is lowered until a participant is willing to accept the auctioneer's price for some quantity of the goods in the lot or until the seller's reserve price is met.[2] If the first bidder does not purchase the entire lot, the auctioneer continues lowering the price until all of the items have been bid for or the reserve price is reached. Items are allocated based on bid order; the highest bidder selects their item(s) first followed by the second highest bidder, etc. In a modification, all of the winning participants pay only the last announced price for the items that they bid on.[1] The Dutch auction is named for its best known example, the Dutch tulip auctions. ("Dutch auction" is also sometimes used to describe online auctions where several identical goods are sold simultaneously to an equal number of high bidders.[19]) In addition to cut flower sales in the Netherlands, Dutch auctions have also been used for perishable commodities such as fish and tobacco.[2] The Dutch auction is not widely used, except in market orders in stock or currency exchanges, which are functionally identical.[1] 

In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.
GAUK Police Auctions & Sales category lists everything you need in an easy to read page outlining all the details of Police Auctions within the UK. In an attempt to stop the lost and found departments becoming crammed and to reduce the number of items stored in the Police Property Store UK police forces sell consignments of stolen and recovered and seized goods through a Police Auction. These sales include vehicles, bicycles, clothing, electronics, furniture and many other items, which end up in the police property room.
Real property - Primarily, this consists of developed land with buildings, usually acquired by the federal government for a specific purpose, such as a military base or office building. This also includes some U.S. Forest Service properties, which usually consist of administrative sites and facilities. The General Services Administration (GSA) is the federal agency responsible for selling developed surplus property.  
Many financial assets, especially government bonds, are issued by an auction. Animportant feature of the design is the auction pricing mechanism: Uniform vs.Discriminatory. Theoretical papers do not provide a definite answer regarding thedominance of one type of auction over the other. We investigate the revealed preferencesof the issuers by surveying the sovereign issuers that conduct auctions. ... [Show full abstract]Read more
2. Know what car you're looking for You can find a list of what’s for sale online, either at Govsales.gov (if it’s a federal police auction) or through your local agency/county/department (just Google it). You need to have a decent idea of what you’re wanting to pick up, or you won’t have time to properly vet everything, which could get messy. See above.
Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 
I wasn't aware that the TSA sold all of the stuff it confiscated! That's cheap goods right there! My mom works for a cruise line, and they don't confiscate stuff, but people do tend to forget all kinds of things they bring on the ship, so every once in a while the company has a big flea market available to employees. I find it funny when my mom comes home with watches and bracelets she wouldn't have otherwise bought.
Private sources. In addition to these free government sites, you can use private sites. These sites provide information about federal and local government auctions. Gov-Auctions gives you access to both federal and state auctions. The sites charge a one-time fee of $39.00 for access to their information. Having all auctions on one site can be helpful. If you are launching a serious car search or buy auction cars on a frequent basis, paying to use this site might make financial sense

Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house
The 18 City of Los Angeles Official Police Garages (OPGs) hold Lien Sales Auctions. The auctions are open to the public. All vehicles are sold "AS IS, WHERE IS" and with all faults. Seller makes no warranty or refunds. Vehicles are sold in an open competitive bid auction. The highest bidder is the buyer. The auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid or stop the sale of a vehicle. In the event of a dispute, the auctioneer's decision will be final.

You could tell that most people knew each other. It felt like these few dozen bidders were part of an exclusive network of junkyard owners and flip-artists who have been bidding on cars against each other for years. Every now and then, when one guy outbid another, you’d see the losing bidder lean over to a friend and talk shit on the winner. “He just buys cars for the sake of buying them. He probably makes no money,” I heard one guy whisper. Police auctions are full of mysteries and secrets.


Depending on the agency, the government may use revenue from auctioned items to support crime-prevention programs, pay restitution to crime victims or purchase new equipment the department needs. "By providing agencies with the ability to dispose of excess assets, GSA benefits taxpayers by eliminating the need to maintain and store the unneeded property while also raising more than $300 million in revenue in just the last two years," a GSA spokesperson said.
YP - The Real Yellow PagesSM - helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business's suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.
From our early days as an online police auction site, there was one piece of property & evidence that we did not touch – firearms. However, recently for many states and jurisdictions it has become a requirement, and even mandated, for law enforcement agencies to auction off their seized, forfeited and unclaimed firearms just as they do with other parts of the property and evidence room.
Internet auctions – With a potential audience of millions the Internet is the most exciting part of the auction world at the moment. Led by sites in the United States but closely followed by UK auction houses, specialist Internet auctions are springing up all over the place, selling everything from antiques and collectibles to holidays, air travel, brand new computers, and household equipment.

A listing of vehicles up for auction will be posted on this website as soon as it becomes available. Flyers containing a vehicle listing for this auction will be available at the Impound Section as soon as we can produce them. Some vehicles may not be listed on the internet, only on the flyer. Please do not call the Impound Section for vehicle information.

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